Comparative Cultures

From InterSciWiki
Jump to: navigation, search

Comparative Cultures

  • cross-cultural comparisons
  • Guide to the Program in Comparative Culture Records, University of California, Irvine AS.014

Finding aid prepared by Processed by Mary Ellen Goddard and Michelle Light; machine-readable finding aid created by Michelle Light Special Collections and Archives, University of California, Irvine Libraries The UCI Libraries P.O. Box 19557 University of California, Irvine

  Irvine, California, 92623-9557 949-824-3947

spcoll@uci.edu © 2008

Networks

My Network

https://www.linkedin.com/mynetwork/

World Cultures

http://escholarship.org/uc/wc_worldcultures


Farzad Ramezani Bonesh

Great list of Scholars farzad ramezani bonesh’s picture farzad ramezani bonesh Member’s occupation سردبیر، پژوهشگر و روزنامه نگار..Reasercher & Journalist Editor & Expert in international relations

Benjamin Blount
Steve Lawrence’s picture
Steve Lawrence
Member’s occupation
Fractal artist, Complexity popularizer and Tour leader
Luis Bettencourt and 11 others
invitation to connect from Steve Lawrence Accept Accept Steve Lawrence’s invitation
Daniel Alberto Alegrett Salazar’s picture
Daniel Alberto Alegrett Salazar
Member’s occupation
Anthropologist, Researcher, Teacher
Benjamin Blount and 5 others
farzad ramezani bonesh
Member’s occupation
سردبیر، پژوهشگر و روزنامه نگار..Researcher & Journalist Editor & Expert in international relations
Benjamin Blount
Ignore Dismiss an invitation to connect from farzad ramezani bonesh Accept Accept farzad ramezani bonesh’s invitation
Steve Lawrence’s picture
Member’s name
Steve Lawrence
Member’s occupation
Fractal artist, Complexity popularizer and Tour leader
Luis Bettencourt and 11 others
Ignore Dismiss an invitation to connect from Steve Lawrence Accept Accept Steve Lawrence’s invitation
Daniel Alberto Alegrett Salazar’s picture
Member’s name
Daniel Alberto Alegrett Salazar
Member’s occupation
Anthropologist, Researcher, Teacher
Benjamin Blount and 5 others

cross-cultural comparisons

 Home  
 Syllabus  
 Readings  
 Handouts  

Instructor: Jeanett Castellanos, Ph.D. Office: Social Science Plaza B 2231 Office Hours: Wednesdays, 1-2pm (via eee) Office Phone: (949) 824-6298

Email: castellj@uci.edu	

Meeting Day: Wednesday 4:00 - 7:00 pm Place: SSL 228 TA: Hesam Rahmani || Office: SSL 640 Office Hours: Thursdays, Noon - 1pm

Email: rahmanih@uci.edu


COURSE DESCRIPTION

This course introduces students to the scope of cross-cultural comparisons by analyzing the theories, methodologies, problems, and ethical issues encountered by anthropologists, sociologists, psychologists, political scientists, and historians as they compare cultures and sub-cultures. More specifically, the class will present the historical development of the dominant American culture and society. The readings will have an emphasis on people in distinctly different societies throughout history, and students will be exposed to concepts that cross all social science disciplines. Themes that will be discussed and used as a basis for writing include democracy, elitism, power, social class, and race.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

Comparing cultures is a lower division class geared toward freshman and sophomores. The focus of this course is to present an opportunity for discussion of current social problems (prejudice, discrimination, ethnic identity, race relations, etc.) in the United States.

GROUND RULES

People often have strong opinions about the topics discussed in a comparing cultures course. Many people have ideas about race and ethnicity that are based on misinformation, stereotypes, and prejudices which are prevalent in our society. We will try to help each other come to a better understanding of different cultures by engaging in active discussions about the various topics involved. In the process, it is possible that members of the class will make comments or voice opinions that are based on misinformation or an interpretation that other members of the class may find objectionable. Given the volatility of the subject matter, it is essential that we treat each other with respect, that we do not demean or devalue the comments of classmates, and that we stick to the issues rather than engage in personal attacks. While you are not expected to agree with everything your classmates may say, you are expected to respect them and their opinions and treat them accordingly. If you disagree with a classmate, respond in a calm, respectful manner in class or speak with me personally. It is a learning experience to try and see the world from different perspectives, whether or not we agree with them.

STUDENTS ARE EXPECTED TO

Read the textbook and assign supplemental materials, and come to class each session prepared to discuss the selected topic(s). Attend class sessions regularly and punctually. Participate actively in group problem solving/work sessions. Complete and present assignments on time.

Bob Pesner

https://www.linkedin.com/in/bobpesner/