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SCCS at eHRAF Feb 8 2016

http://hraf.yale.edu/cross-cultural-research/sccs-cases-in-ehraf/?utm_source=Recap%26Preview_MbrFA_20160211&utm_campaign=MemberFA_Recap%26Preview&utm_medium=email

eHRAF World Cultures & Archaeology databases - 2015 Review and 2016 Preview

Dear Doug,

Glad you liked what we did with regard to the SCCS. We will probably have 3-4 more cases later in the spring and we plan to add about 9 next year. We probably will do the same for the Ethnographic Atlas. Carol


-------

Human Relations Area Files (HRAF) eHRAF World Cultures & Archaeology

Review of 2015 and Preview of 2016


Photo of the HRAF team The HRAF Team Photo credit: Paul Moore www.paulmoorephotography.com Dear Faculty of HRAF Member Institutions,

Wishing you a good spring semester! I would like to share a brief summary of what the HRAF team accomplished in 2015 and preview the projects we are working this year. You can find a more detailed overview in the eHRAF Highlights section on our home page at http://hraf.yale.edu.

Highlights of 2015

  • eHRAF World Cultures & eHRAF Archaeology each voted by Choice Magazine "Top 10 Internet Resources."
  • Catalog records for cultures/traditions from the eHRAF databases have been made available in EBSCO's Discovery Service and OCLC WorldCat/WorldShare services.
  • Improvements to eHRAF databases:
   Citations features allow for quick copying, saving, or exporting bibliographic information
   In eHRAF's Advanced Search (Add Cultures feature) users now can select all cultures by country at once
   Improved print/email results with better output of section titles for ease of navigating and recording sources and places within the text
   Additional sample filtering to the Standard Cross-Cultural Sample, a widely used cross-cultural sample

A Preview of Projects in 2016

  • We will be putting out our annual culture and tradition installments in batches throughout the spring. Six new cultures were added last week for a total of 301 cultures.
  • HRAF's curated Outline of Cultural Materials subject classification system will be refreshed with an interactive HTML view.
  • Brand new help documentation that has been reformatted top to bottom to include every aspect of the eHRAF databases.
  • Posts about HRAF's long and fascinating history in anthropology.
  • More teaching and research aids for faculty
   A brand new Online Course in Cross Cultural Research Methods
   A new Explaining Human Cultures module, titled "Altered States of Consciousness" 
   Database of previous cross-cultural findings for comparative research including results from over 900 studies 

My colleagues and I hope that our new features, guides, and services will make learning and using eHRAF easier than ever before, whether for research, classroom or library use.

As always, we welcome suggestions and feedback that help us improve both our eHRAF databases, our homepage, and our (human) services.

Thank you again to our members for your support!

Best regards,

Christiane Cunnar HRAF Member Services Administrator Human Relations Area Files (HRAF) at Yale University 755 Prospect Street New Haven, CT 06511 USA

Phone: 1-800-520-HRAF or 203-764-9401 Email: christiane.cunnar@yale.edu HRAF Home Page: http://hraf.yale.edu

Carol:

Subject: What you just published for the first 134 SCCS societies, now covered in eHRAF and its further development, is fantastic.

It will be well covered in the Companion. Yesterday no less, I had terrific news from Wiley -- while there have been four previous reviewers of the manuscript some leaving for other jobs, and the latest and least fired as Wiley is reorganizing -- is that they have given me an outstanding reviewer-cum-project manager for winding up the book.

Looks to me that this will make my job easier and that we'll be able to finish up quicker than I thought; and that I can conserve my needed energy in the process.

Database of Hypotheses Feb 8 2016

Dear Doug,

Glad you liked what we did with regard to the SCCS. We will probably have 3-4 more cases later in the spring and we plan to add about 9 next year. We probably will do the same for the Ethnographic Atlas.

I don't remember if I told you, but as part of Explaining Human Culture (http://hraf.yale.edu/resources/faculty/explaining-human-culture/), we are going to be launching a database of hypotheses and findings on about 900 cross-cultural studies in a month or so. I've been working on that for a few years now. It will be a beta version and we have decided to make it open to the public.

Glad you are getting a good project manager.

Best wishes, Carol

About hrafARC

Items

   hrafARC Current Research
   hrafARC Launch
   HRAF Services Platform

HRAF Advanced Research Centres (hrafARC) aims to promote basic and applied research in anthropology, and to encourage and support comparative and cross-cultural research. hrafARC aims to further the development of anthropology through comparative knowledge based on testable theory, sound research design and systematic methods for the collection and analysis of data. We seek to fulfill the historic mission of anthropology to describe and explain the range of variation in human biology, society, and culture across time and space.

hrafARC Current Research

HRAF at Yale is launching its Advanced Research Center with a 4-year NSF-funded interdisciplinary project “Climate-Related Hazards, Disasters, and Cultural Transformations.” Researchers from cultural anthropology, archaeology, psychology, geography and climatology, will compare worldwide samples of societies, archaeological traditions, and countries in their responses to hazards related to food production, storage, and availability. Read more … hrafARC Launch

Collaboration opens up significant new opportunities for comparative ethnography-based ‘research and implementation’

The Human Relations Areas Files (HRAF) – an internationally recognized anthropological research organization at Yale University – announces new institutes in the USA and Europe to promote comparative ethnographic research applied to complex contemporary problems. More specifically, HRAF Advanced Research Centers (hrafARC) aims to develop and apply new paradigms for comparative research to address outcomes emerging from human complexity and diversity. hrafARC has an overarching goal of expanding its reach and programs globally and invites other collaborations.

At Yale, HRAF is launching its Advanced Research Center with a project supported by the National Science Foundation. "Climate-Related Hazards, Disasters, and Cultural Transformations" has investigators from cultural anthropology, archaeology, psychology, geography and climatology, comparing worldwide samples of societies, archaeological traditions, and countries in their responses to hazards related to food production, storage, and availability. The PI for the grant is Carol R. Ember (HRAF), and the co-PIs are Benjamin Felzer (Lehigh University), Michele J. Gelfand (University of Maryland), Eric C. Jones (University of Texas-Houston), and Peter N. Peregrine (Lawrence University). The Senior Personnel are Teferi Abate Adem (HRAF) and Ian Skoggard (HRAF). More information about the project can be found at http://hraf.yale.edu/research/hrafarc/. hrafARC was established by Carol R. Ember, President of HRAF, and Michael D. Fischer, Vice President of HRAF.

hrafARC [EU] is initially developing research focused on the core themes of (a) food security and the sustainable organisation of agriculture and markets, and (b) the interplay of disjunctive narratives and discourses, with initial applications to reducing ethnic tension in the EU. hrafARC is seeking funding through ‘Horizon 2020’, the EU Framework Programme for research and innovation and other funding bodies. hrafARC [EU] was established by Michael. D. Fischer, Professor of Anthropological Sciences and Director of the Centre for Social Anthropology and Computing and Alan Bicker, Senior Research Fellow, both of the School of Anthropology and Conservation at the University of Kent, UK. More information about these projects can be found at http://hrafarc.eu/.

We are very pleased to be collaborating with HRAF on this exciting new approach to research. We are already engaged in investigating issues of food security within the EU and beyond. Indeed, it is our intention over time to establish HRAF-affiliated ARC Institutes in other EU countries, as well as East Asia and Japan. In so doing, we welcome collaboration with colleagues across the world, in an effort to address these key issues beyond the constraints of university systems. Alan Bicker, Director, Europe

hrafARC is currently pursuing several research concepts including:

   Cross-cultural research based on primary and secondary data
   If, when, and how invention and consequent emergent capabilities become pervasive choices
   Human agency and its distribution as a key social and cultural resource and driver
   Public involvement in the creation, use and distribution of knowledge
   Emergent forms of local, global and trans-cultural organisation


Tor browser only

  • http://www.cro3.org/content/53/02/53-0580.extract / doi: 10.5860/CHOICE.191356 R. B. Ridinger of Northern Illinois University in Choice’s previous review of eHRAF back in 2003. *** Robert Ridinger Elec Resc Info Mgr rridinger@niu.edu 815-753-1367 Libraries ***

CHOICE October 2015 vol. 53 no. 02

53-0580 Internet Resource

eHRAF World Cultures, from the Human Relations Area Files, Yale University. Human Relations Area Files. http://hraf.yale.edu/online-databases/ehraf-world-cultures/ Contact publisher for pricing

[Revisited Jul'15] The complex Human Relations Area Files (HRAF) project at Yale has furthered an extremely important research goal since 1949: the detailed comparative analysis of individual cultures via in-depth indexing of the full texts of major anthropological research monographs, periodical articles, essays, dissertations, and photographic collections. The number of pages contained in the electronic (eHRAF) database has expanded from 350,000 to 600,000 since the time of the last review (CH, Dec'03, 41-1926). The coverage of 290 cultures has been amplified by the inclusion of Canadian and US immigrant groups and by historical periods—both features … [Full Text of this Article] Full Text: $20 eHRAF World Cultures. Choice October 2015 53:53-0580; Full Text eHRAF World Cultures / Choice October 2015 53:53-0580;

Related Articles

   REFERENCE - Social & Behavioral Sciences eHRAF Archaeology
   Choice October 2015 53:53-0579; doi:10.5860/CHOICE.191348
       Extract Full Text 
   REFERENCE - Social & Behavioral Sciences eHRAF Collections of Ethnography/Archaeology
   Choice December 2003 41:41-1926; doi:10.5860/CHOICE.41-1926
   Outstanding Title!

41-1926 Internet Resource eHRAF Collections of Ethnography/Archaeology. Human Relations Area Files Press, Inc. (HRAF). Price varies Internet Resource. http://www.yale.edu/hraf/collections.htm

To create these Web sites, two sections of the full Human Relations Area Files (HRAF) data set have been broken out as the eHRAF Collections of Ethnography/Archaeology. This electronic version of the HRAF project, associated with Yale since 1949, demonstrates the access potential of the Internet. HRAF's basic format (numeric indexing of …

   REFERENCE - Social & Behavioral Sciences Cross-cultural CD: v.1, pt.1: Human sexuality, pt.2: Marriage; v.2, pt.3: Family
   Choice February 1993 30:30-3052; doi:10.5860/CHOICE.30-3052
       Extract Full Text

eHRAF

http://hraf.yale.edu/about/testimonials/choice-review-ehraf-world-cultures/
http://hraf.yale.edu/ehraf-databases-rated-highly-recommended-by-choice-magazine/?utm_source=FA_Mbr_AAA_20151112&utm_campaign=MbrFA_AAA_2015&utm_medium=email
http://www.ala.org/acrl/choice/home
http://www.ala.org/acrl/choice/oct15
  • http://lucy.ukc.ac.uk/EthnoAtlas/ - http://lucy.ukc.ac.uk/EthnoAtlas/Hmar/Cult_dir/Culture.7831 - http://lucy.ukc.ac.uk/EthnoAtlas/Hmar/Cult_dir - *http://lucy.ukc.ac.uk/EthnoAtlas/societies.html - http://lucy.ukc.ac.uk/EthnoAtlas/clasification.html
  • list from UCI HRAF -- Azande -- Mbuti -- Amhara -- Bagisu -- Banyoro -- Bena -- Ganda -- Gusil -- Maasai -- Nuer -- Somali -- Libyan Bedouin -- Shluh -- Bemba -- Betsileo -- Lakeshore Tonga -- Lozi -- Ovimbundu -- San -- Zulu -- Akan -- Dogon -- Hausa -- Igbo -- Kanuri -- Tiv -- Wolof -- Ghorbat -- Hazara -- Inner Mongolia -- Karakalpak -- Kyrgyz -- Lepcha -- Mongolia -- Pamir peoples -- Pashtun -- Sherpa -- Tajiks -- Turkmens -- Uzbeks -- Korea -- Monguor -- Okinawans -- Taiwan Hokkien -- Chukchee -- Koryaks -- Yakut -- Andamans -- Badaga -- Baluchi -- Bengali -- Garo -- Khasi -- Santal -- Sinhalese -- Alorese -- Central Thai -- Eastern Toraja -- Iban -- Ifugao -- Mentawaians -- Rungus Dusun -- Southern Toraja -- Highland Scots -- Early Icelanders -- Icelanders -- Saami -- Bosnian Muslims -- Croats -- Greeks -- Montenegrins -- Serbs -- Slovenes-- Basques -- Cubans -- Dominicans -- Island Carib -- Jamaicans -- Garifuna -- Kuna -- Zapotec -- Maya (Yucatan Peninsula) -- Tzeltal -- Huichol -- Tarahumara -- Iran -- Israelis -- Kurds -- Lur -- Palestinians -- Turks -- Yemenis -- Aleut -- Alutiiq -- Chipewyans -- Copper Inuit -- Ojibwa -- Delaware -- Iroquois -- Seminole -- Chinookans of the Lower Columbia River -- Pomo -- Quinault -- Tlingit -- Yokuts -- Yuki -- Assiniboine -- Blackfoot -- Klamath -- Pawnee -- Stoney -- Arab Americans -- Arab Canadians -- Basque Americans -- Cajuns -- Chicanos -- Chinese Americans -- Chinese Canadians -- Cuban Americans -- Haitian Americans -- Italian Americans -- Italian Canadians -- Korean Americans -- North American Armenians -- North American HasidicJews -- North American Hmong -- Puerto Ricans (Mainland) -- Sea Islanders -- Serbian Americans -- Hopi -- Navajo -- Western Apache -- Zia Pueblo -- Aranda -- Kapauku -- Malekula -- Manus -- Orokaiva -- Santa Cruz Islanders -- Trobriands -- Chuuk -- Yapese -- Hawaiians -- Lau Fijians -- Tikopia -- Tongans -- Bakairi -- Jivaro -- Mundurucu -- Ndyuka -- Saramaka -- Shipibo -- Tukano -- Warao -- Yanoama -- Aymara -- Inka -- Bahia Brazilians -- Bororo -- Guarani -- Tupinamba -- Kogi -- Mataco -- Ona--- Yahgan
  • UCI Library type: HRAF - Antpac HRAF

UCI eHRAF list - HRAF's software

(Once logged on, I recommend the BROWSE CULTURES to explore the CULTURE SUMMARIES and for searches the ADVANCED SEARCH (not the Basic Search!). To get familiar with eHRAF please view the short video tutorials at the "Learning Center" of the entry page. Also check out how eHRAF is used for teaching and research at http://www.facebook.com/HumanRelationsAreaFiles). Sem Cub


  • 46 or 25% of the SCCS files are still missing in HRAF. SEE: List of SCCS societies. Only 3 have been added since 1969.

Latest Aug 2015

Visit HRAF's Facebook page at http://www.facebook.com/HumanRelationsAreaFiles to find out how HRAF's "classic" ethnographies may give new insights into current research issues and world events.

Human Relations Area Files Teaching Ideas for the eHRAF World Cultures & Archaeology Databases

Dear Faculty at HRAF Member Institutions,

Are you looking for new teaching ideas for the upcoming semesters? Why not have your students explore a topic that recently made the world news. In the June 2015 issue of American Anthropologist, Jankowiak, Volsche, and Garcia investigated whether romantic kissing is a human universal. The report captured a great deal of popular media attention. For part of their research, they used our online ethnographic database, eHRAF World Cultures, to answer this fascinating question.

Our post in the eHRAF Highlights section on our homepage at http://hraf.yale.edu outlines some of the report's main findings illustrated with additional ethnographic examples retrieved from eHRAF.

At the end of the post, we have also provided sample searches with step-by-step instructions that your students can use to search eHRAF.

For other teaching ideas using eHRAF World Cultures and eHRAF Archaeology, visit "Teaching eHRAF", where you can find:

  • 40+ online student exercises, group assignments and syllabi
  • Undergraduate- and graduate-level exercises
  • Sections on cultural anthropology, medical anthropology, archaeology, and cross-cultural research methods
  • Topics ranging from studying hunter-gatherers to native people of South America to salt use in diet

We also provide support for our faculty members, including customized webinars for classroom instruction.

Please contact me if you have any questions about how eHRAF can be used for students to learn about cultural diversity.

Enjoy the rest of the summer recess.

Christiane Cunnar

Member Services Human Relations Area Files (HRAF) at Yale University 755 Prospect Street New Haven, CT 06511 Phone: 1-800-520-HRAF or 203-764-9401 Fax: 203-764-9466 Email: christiane.cunnar@yale.edu

Latest Oct 2013-Oct 2014

eHRAF World Cultures & Archaeology Unique Online Resources for Teaching & Research

eHRAF World CulturesHuman Relations Area Files (HRAF), a non-profit research organization at Yale University, offers you temporary free access to eHRAF World Cultures & Archaeology.

http://hraf.yale.edu/?utm_source=NonMbrFA_WCTR_20141016&utm_campaign=MbrAnthroSubsistence&utm_medium=email

eHRAF World Cultures & Archaeology Online Resources for Teaching & Research

Login: See Notes.doc http://ehrafworldcultures.yale.edu

http://ehrafarchaeology.yale.edu username: AnthroF... password for October 2013: Ton... Log on to eHRAF World Cultures & eHRAF Archaeology via http://hraf.yale.edu and click on the blue and brown tabs to the right (see picture above). You'll be prompted for a login. October's username is e....12 and the password is Abda15. Both are case sensitive.

Key Features for the eHRAF databases:

   Ideal for studies of individual societies and archaeological traditions, regional and cross-cultural comparisons  
   Over 700 searchable subjects on all aspects of traditional cultural and social life
   Subjects include ethnomedicine (e.g. theory of disease), family (including child-rearing practices) and kinship, settlements,economy, and religious and funerary practices
   Paragraph-level subject indexing for efficient retrieval of information   
   Ethnographic works include books, journal articles, dissertations, and monographs
   Western & non-Western cultures, ethnic minorities, indigenous people, and archaeological traditions : 
   Ethnographies and prehistoric archeological traditions organized by  major regions of the world
   Paragraph-level subject indexing for efficient retrieval of information
   Subjects include material culture (e.g. ceramic technology), family, child-rearing, economy, arts, and religion
   Ideal for studies of individual societies and archaeological traditions, regional and cross-cultural comparisons 

For research using eHRAF it's best to email me directly at christiane.cunnar@yale.edu and briefly describe your research topic as I might give useful search tips. Semester-long trials are available for faculty who want to use eHRAF for teaching and student assignments.

Feel free to share this log-in info with your colleagues, or have them contact me so that they also learn more about these unique databases for cross-cultural and archaeological studies.

Please note that our homepage has recently been redesigned and contains new information including links to:

RESOURCES CENTER

   Faculty: Teaching eHRAF - 30+ online student exercises
   Researchers: Ethnographic research for archaeologists and cross-cultural research 
   User Support: Practical guide to using eHRAF, search examples & methodology

Regards,

Christiane Cunnar
Member Services
Human Relations Area Files (HRAF) at Yale University
755 Prospect Street
New Haven, CT 06511
Phone: 1-800-520-HRAF or  203-764-9401
Fax: 203-764-9466
Email: christiane.cunnar@yale.edu
http://www.yale.edu/hraf
 
Follow HRAF news and activities on:
WordPress: http://hraf755.wordpress.com
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/HumanRelationsAreaFiles
Academia Edu: http://yale.academia.edu/HumanRelationsAreaFilesYaleUniversity

Latest Feb 2013

Human Relations Area Files logo eHRAF World Cultures & Archaeology Online Resources for Teaching & Research

people under tree in Africa Human Relations Area Files (HRAF), a non-profit research organization at Yale University, offers you temporary free access to eHRAF World Cultures & Archaeology.

Login: http://ehrafworldcultures-beta.its.yale.edu/ehrafe/ http://ehrafarchaeology-beta.its.yale.edu username: Nuer1 password: February

Tip! Use "Add Cultures" and "Add Subjects" in Advanced Search to optimize your search (see example at

http://screencast.com/t/tlm3WPmI ).

Key Features:

  Ideal for studies of individual societies and archaeological traditions, regional and cross-cultural comparisons  
  Over 700 searchable subjects on all aspects of cultural and social life
  Subjects include material culture (e.g. ceramic technology), family, child-rearing, kinship, economy, arts, and religion.
  Full-text databases include books, journal articles, dissertations, and monographs  
  Western & non-Western cultures, ethnic minorities, indigenous people, and archaeological traditions 
  Paragraph-level subject indexing for efficient retrieval of information   

New Feature! Now you can sort your culture/archaeological traditions results in eHRAF by subsistence types such as hunter-gathers (HRAF refers to them as "foragers" as shown in this example at http://screencast.com/t/6yckBcAyb9Kw ).

If you have questions about our subsistence type features, or need advice in using eHRAF for your research and/or teaching please contact hraf@yale.edu, or email me. I'd be happy to assist.

Regards,

Christiane Cunnar Member Services

Examples

Subsistence Types in eHRAF World Cultures April 2012

We often get requests from users of eHRAF World Cultures to search by subsistence types (e.g. hunter-gatherers, pastoralists, agriculturalists, etc.). We are working on an improved interface with new features-one of these features will allow users to narrow their search by type of subsistence.

In the meantime, if you or your students want to study a particular type of society, such as hunter-gatherers (foragers), you can find a list of "Subsistence Types" in http://ehrafworldcultures.yale.edu through a link in the left-hand margin. I've put together a short tutorial that shows how to search for subsistence types using the current interface (see You Tube http://youtu.be/UQnKPrYotqA on hunter-gatherers using plant-based foods). Please share this information with your students who may want to use eHRAF for their final project papers this semester.

Regards,

Christiane Cunnar Member Services Human Relations Area Files (HRAF) at Yale University 755 Prospect Street New Haven, CT 06511

Phone: 1-800-520-HRAF or 203-764-9401 Fax: 203-764-9466 Email: christiane.cunnar@yale.edu http://www.yale.edu/hraf Sign up for the HRAF Newsfeed: http://hraf755.wordpress.com/feed http://yale.academia.edu/HumanRelationsAreaFilesYaleUniversity Like us on FacebookFollow us on TwitterView our profile on LinkedInFind us on Google+View our videos on YouTubeVisit our blog

Using HRAF with SCCS

Ember, Carol. 2007 Using the HRAF Collection of Ethnography in Conjunction with the with Standard Cross-Cultural Sample... Cross-Cultural Research 41(4):396-427. DOI: 10.1177/1069397107306593

The capacity to retrieve subsamples of their cases came about after a board meeting about 5 years ago where we decided that we needed to support the SCCS within eHRAF. We're about 70% there now, and in another few years will have the lot. Unfortunately only a few cultures can be added in a year at current capacity.

There is a new interface about to surface, which is much much better than the present one. Also, over the next couple of years the content of HRAF will be exposed as data mineable services. There are also plans to start integrating services for analysing the data within the platform, particularly once we can start exploiting all the effort that has been put into coding different societies in the SCCS. There would be room for your current work on R based services, which I am doing some parallel things with.

New eHRAF beta version (brand new, for evaluation)

From Pauline Manaka (died June 2017), Social Science Librarian, Oct 2. Here is the new beta test version of eHRAF with a smoother interface (comparatively speaking). Please have the students use this (Alt urls: http://ehrafworldcultures.yale.edu/). <Beta-test version of the **eHRAF World Cultures**>. Then start with BROWSE. Please see the pdf guide for this version that I created with the class assignment in mind.

The eHRAF World Cultures is a cross-cultural database that contains information on all aspects of cultural and social life. The annually-growing eHRAF database is unique in that the information is organized by cultures and ethnic groups and the full-text sources are subject-indexed at the paragraph level. The beta version will contain 10 additional cultures.

The students might also want to fill out the survey to give Christiane Cunnar at the HRAF member services, some <feedback>: http://hraf.yale.asp.educarasurvey.com.

P.S. I have been negotiating to get remote access to the beta version. So please encourage the students to email me if they are having access from outside the UCI Libraries, with their login ids.

The current version database is called, eHRAF Collection of Ethnography and does not yet have the additional cultures. Please encourage your TA to talk to me and I can help them assist the students. We may NOT need a class visit. Thank you for your patience.

Using eHRAF? (the older version)

<eHraf> offers snippets of text from selected ethnographies using an index of topics. The acronym eHRAF stands for electronic Human Relations Area Files, to which many libraries (including UCI) subscribe. There is an <eHraf help page>, although the following may be sufficient:

BEFORE looking into the eHRAF files for ethnographic cases, PRINT the <list of SCCS societies> and keep it open on the web to check (by searching the the society name) whether any given eHRAF case corresponds to one in the SCCS. If you don't do this you cannot compare SCCS codes on a society with ethnographic cases in eHRAF. Doug's example: I took as a focus "Community", searched topics under "C" and found 621, 747 and 365. Then I used used the "Search" option for 621 or 747 or 365 plus Alorese (#89 in the SCCS list or bibliography) and eHRAF returned the link "Alorese, OF05 38 matching paragraphs in 2 documents." Clicking that link returned http://quod.lib.umich.edu/cgi/e/ehraf/ehraf-idx?type=boolean;c=ehrafe;ocm1=621;ocm2op=or;ocm2=747;ocm3op=or;ocm3=365;op2=and;op3=and;rgn=paragraphs;owc=OF05;view=layer2 with all the text from the two sources. From these, could I could write about how it might feel to be a member of this community? Frankly, I find this kind of fragmentation of source material disconcerting. It is hard to piece together to form a coherent whole. In the SCCS we recommended consulting the entire text, primary source first, as in the SCCS bibliography option, although you need to go to the library to get the book (preferably) or journal article. Then you can use the book index to look up your topic keywords, like "community," and have all the material in a context for easy browsing. I would like your evaluations if you do use eHRAF. This was the first time I have ever consulted eHRAF and it was not very rewarding. This source is also not the same time and place as that of Cora DuBois, who wrote our Principal Source, The People of Alor. Sorry, eHRAF, but maybe the students in the class or Pauline Manaka will change my mind. - Doug 09:56, 28 September 2007 (PDT). Later I did return to look at that second source, however, The People of Alor, and did find it useful so it will be a mixed bag, depending on the source.

Once you have the ethnographic cases you want to use, MAKE SURE YOU ARE CONNECTED THROUGH VPN (in which case access is automatic, otherwise, although you will be asked to give your UCid and password, you still won't obtain access), and browse the <eHRAF topics>, list your topic numbers and the try Search using those numbers AND specifying a given culture.

You can also try <browse by cultures> but using search is better.

Social science librarian Pauline Manaka <pdmanaka [at] UCI [dot] EDU> will post additional material the wiki site on the first Tuesday of class. "If the students need my help, I will be glad to meet individually with them or at your invitation.... thanks, pauline"

Back to Human Social Complexity and World Cultures where we started.

The alternative

The alternative to using eHRAF is to find ethnographic books and articles, selected from the <SCCS ethnographic bibliography>, and then do an on-line check of whether they are available and node check out at the campus library. The SAR in Santa Fe (School of Advanced Research, formerly School of American Research) has a large collection of SCCS sources for 100+ of the 186. Just browse through the list starting on page 9, choose a time and place, then search for the name of the community or focus, and use "find", e.g., for "Alorese" (SCCS#89) in the bibliography. There we find the books and articles by Principal Authority: Cora Dubois, time-1938 place-Abui of Atimelang Village. This way to get your ethnographic materials is my preference - Doug 10:12, 28 September 2007 (PDT).

Developments

eHRAF lite will be is cheaper and more accessible. Any thoughts regarding new capabilities and improvements would be very welcome. budget of 30k ... a good chance to bring it into the 21st century.

HRAF Probability Sample Files (Naroll 1967; Lagace 1979)

Robert O. Lagacé. 1979. The HRAF Probability Sample: Retrospect and Prospect.

Links

Back to Human Social Complexity and World Cultures, a social science writing class, UC Irvine, School of Social Science

Outline of Cultural Materials

Tests

Joking

  • Joking" Searched 258 culture. Found 689 paragraphs in 242 documents in 107 cultures (41.5%) According to Instructions: Christiane Cunnar.
  • FORGET Joking" Searched 258 cultures. Found 660 paragraphs in 228 documents in 100 cultures (39%).
  • FORGETJoking" and Foragers (Narrow Results) Searched 258 culture. Found 2762 paragraphs in 826 documents in 200 cultures.
Search Query:
Show / Hide
  • Narrow Results
By Subsistence Type
Foragers
Primarily Foragers
 Africa (259 paragraphs in 72 documents in 28 cultures)
Subregion	 Culture Name	 OWC	 Subsistence Type	 Samples	 No. Documents	 No. Paragraphs
Central Africa	          Mbuti 	FO04	Foragers	PSF	1	2
Southern Africa	          San 	FX10	Foragers		18	111
Asia (51 paragraphs in 31 documents in 18 cultures)
Subregion	 Culture Name	 OWC	 Subsistence Type	 Samples	 No. Documents	 No. Paragraphs
Europe (4 paragraphs in 3 documents in 3 cultures)
Middle America and the Caribbean (16 paragraphs in 5 documents in 4 cultures)
North America (281 paragraphs in 86 documents in 27 cultures)
 Subregion	 Culture Name	 OWC	 Subsistence Type	 Samples	 No. Documents	 No. Paragraphs
Arctic and Subarctic	 Aleut 	NA06	Foragers		1	1
Arctic and Subarctic	 Copper Inuit 	ND08	Foragers	PSF	2	2
Arctic and Subarctic	 Innu 	NH06	Foragers		1	3
Arctic and Subarctic	 Ojibwa 	NG06	Foragers	PSF	7	38
Eastern Woodlands	 Mi'kmaq 	NJ05	Foragers		2	3
Northwest Coast&Ca	 Nuu-chah-nulth 	NE11	Foragers		1	1
Northwest Coast&Ca	 Tlingit 	NA12	Foragers	PSF	5	31
Northwest Coast&Ca	 Yuki 	NS30	Foragers		1	2
Plains and Plateau	 Assiniboine 	NF04	Foragers	SRS	1	1
Plains and Plateau	 Blackfoot 	NF06	Foragers	PSF	1	1 
Plains and Plateau	 Comanche 	NO06	Foragers		3	6
 Oceania (61 paragraphs in 30 documents in 16 cultures)
Subregion	 Culture Name	 OWC	 Subsistence Type	 Samples	 No. Documents	 No. Paragraphs
Melanesia	         Manus 	OM06	Foragers		7	19
 South America (17 paragraphs in 15 documents in 11 cultures)
Subregion	 Culture Name	 OWC	 Subsistence Type	 Samples	 No. Documents	 No. Paragraphs
Amazon and Orinoco	 Sirionó 	SF21	Foragers		1	1
Amazon and Orinoco	 Warao 	SS18	Foragers		1	1
Eastern South America	 Bororo 	SP08	Foragers	PSF	1	1
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Finished. Searched 258 culture. Found 468 paragraphs in 199 documents in 90 cultures. 35% Search Query: Show / Hide

Narrow Results

By Subsistence Type Foragers Primarily Foragers Pastoralists Horticulturalists Intensive Agriculturalists Agro-pastoralists Other Subsistence Combinations Commercial Economy By Sample Probability Sample Files (PSF) Simple Random Sample (SRS)

Africa (173 paragraphs in 67 documents in 26 cultures)

Subregion Culture Name OWC Subsistence Type Samples No. Documents No. Paragraphs Central Africa Mbuti FO04 Foragers PSF 1 1 Southern Africa San FX10 Foragers 12 43 Close Box TIP -- Hold Shift to Sort Accross Multiple Columns

Asia (57 paragraphs in 28 documents in 19 cultures)

Subregion Culture Name OWC Subsistence Type Samples No. Documents No. Paragraphs South Asia Vedda AX05 Foragers 1 1 Close Box TIP -- Hold Shift to Sort Accross Multiple Columns

Europe (7 paragraphs in 6 documents in 3 cultures)
Middle America and the Caribbean (7 paragraphs in 3 documents in 2 cultures)
North America (110 paragraphs in 53 documents in 21 cultures)
Subregion	 Culture Name	 OWC	 Subsistence Type	 Samples	 No. Documents	 No. Paragraphs
Arctic and Subarctic	 Alutiiq 	NA10	Foragers		1	2
Arctic and Subarctic	 Chipewyans 	ND07	Foragers		2	2
Arctic and Subarctic	 Copper Inuit 	ND08	Foragers	PSF	1	1
Arctic and Subarctic	 Ojibwa 	NG06	Foragers	PSF	6	11
Northwest Coast and California	 Nuu-chah-nulth 	NE11	Foragers		1	1
Northwest Coast and California	 Tlingit 	NA12	Foragers	PSF	4	10
Northwest Coast and California	 Yuki 	NS30	Foragers		2	2
Plains and Plateau	 Assiniboine 	NF04	Foragers	SRS	1	1
Plains and Plateau	 Blackfoot 	NF06	Foragers	PSF	1	1
Plains and Plateau	 Comanche 	NO06	Foragers		1	1
Plains and Plateau	 Stoney 	NF12	Foragers		1	1
Southwest and Basin	 Mescalero Apache 	NT25	Foragers		3	8
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 Oceania (106 paragraphs in 35 documents in 13 cultures) 
Subregion	 Culture Name	 OWC	 Subsistence Type	 Samples	 No. Documents	 No. Paragraphs
Melanesia	 Manus 	OM06	Foragers		8	60
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 South America (8 paragraphs in 7 documents in 6 cultures)
Subregion	 Culture Name	 OWC	 Subsistence Type	 Samples	 No. Documents	 No. Paragraphs
Amazon and Orinoco	 Sirionó 	SF21	Foragers		1	1
Amazon and Orinoco	 Warao 	SS18	Foragers		1	1
Southern South America	 Yahgan 	SH06	Foragers		1	1
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Forget

Africa (244 paragraphs in 65 documents in 24 cultures)
Asia (46 paragraphs in 28 documents in 16 cultures)
Europe (4 paragraphs in 3 documents in 3 cultures)
Middle America and the Caribbean (16 paragraphs in 5 documents in 4 cultures)
North America (274 paragraphs in 82 documents in 26 cultures)
Oceania (59 paragraphs in 30 documents in 16 cultures)
South America (17 paragraphs in 15 documents in 11 cultures)
North America (274 paragraphs in 82 documents in 26 cultures)
*Those in the Binford 34
Subregion	 Culture Name	 OWC	 Subsistence Type	 Samples	 No. Documents	 No. Paragraphs
Arctic and Subarctic	 Aleut 	        NA06	Foragers		1	1
Arctic and Subarctic	 Copper Inuit 	ND08	Foragers	PSF	2	2
Arctic and Subarctic	 Innu 	        NH06	Foragers		1	3
Arctic and Subarctic	 OjibwaSaulteaux 	NG06	Foragers	PSF	7	38
Eastern Woodlands-	 Mi'kmaq 	NJ05	Foragers		1	2
Northwest Coast&Ca	 Nuu-chah-nulth NE11	Foragers		1	1
Northwest Coast&Ca	 Tlingit 	NA12	Foragers	PSF	5	31
Northwest Coast&Ca	 Yuki 	 	NS30	Foragers		1	2
Plains and Plateau--	 Assiniboine 	NF04	Foragers	SRS	1	1
Plains and Plateau--	 Blackfoot 	NF06	Foragers	PSF	1	1
Plains and Plateau--	 *Comanche 	NO06	Foragers		3	6
Southwest and Basin	 Navajo 	NT13	Agro-pastoralists		14	45
Regional and Ethnic Cultures	 Chicanos 	N007	Commercial Economy		1	1
Regional and Ethnic Cultures	 Puerto Ricans (Mainland) 	NK05	Commercial Economy		1	1
Eastern Woodlands-	 Iroquois 	NM09	Horticulturalists	PSF	2	3
Eastern Woodlands-	 Seminole 	NN16	Horticulturalists		4	8
Southwest and Basin	 Hopi 	NT09	Intensive Agriculturalists	PSF	10	22
Southwest and Basin	 Tewa Pueblos 	NT18	Intensive Agriculturalists		1	1
Southwest and Basin	 Zuni 	NT23	Intensive Agriculturalists		3	3
Eastern Woodlands	 Cherokee 	NN08	Other Subsistence Combinations		4	15
Southwest and Basin	 O'odham 	NU79	Other Subsistence Combinations		1	1
Eastern Woodlands	 Creek 	NN11	Primarily Foragers		1	1
Eastern Woodlands	 Delaware 	NM07	Primarily Foragers		2	2
Eastern Woodlands	 Winnebago/Ho-Chunk 	NP12	Primarily Foragers		3	5
Plains and Plateau	 Pawnee 	NQ18	Primarily Foragers	PSF	1	6
Southwest and Basin	 Western Apache 	NT21	Primarily Foragers		10	72
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Comments304 eHRAF

Doug to Pauline Manaka Dear Pauline (she died June 2017), The major advances at HRAF reported by Vice President Mike Fischer are toward adding features and SCCS cultures that greatly enhance what we have been doing here at UC Irvine. So by all means, do everything possible to keep our eHRAF files. The list of societies in SCCS is now moving to a single tab but that might occur after the upcoming HRAF board meeting. Thanks for your help. Doug

Dear Doug, Congratulations on things really coming together, and moving forward. WIth respect to HRAF development, we are making progress in adding SCCS cultures. We have added to the published web application interface an option to restrict results to the SCCS cultures in the proper time and place context. We are basing a web application on Carol's table relating the different available samples. I am meeting with HRAF IT staff next week to formalise our services framework and an IT development plan for the next year. This will focus on two major things, implementing the services framework (simply an architecture for organising the internal model for services for HRAF so it is maintainable, extensible and can be modified), some specific services that facilitate data mining, summarisation, topical mapping, notebooks, public, publishable, permalinks to specific sections of text, and virtual documents. Second, permalinks and virtual documents are critical to a new emphasis towards moving more of HRAF databases outside the paywall, which I have secured a firm commitment to. We have already exposed all the pages not relating to the database itself, which was a big step conceptually for the organisation. This will shortly include the cultural summaries. We will likely over the next year have a version of the web application that is publicly available that returns sizeable text fragments from the result of queries. There may initially be limitations on which subset of cultures are included in this. These results can populate virtual documents, which we can moderate to represent fair use of the underlying copyrighted material. For most searches no such moderation is needed … the outcomes 'naturally' represent fair use. This means these can be freely published on the web. There will also be specific services that can be called 'raw' or have a web application version, like a topic cloud overview of a search, summarisation of texts which produces fair use representation of the contents. I'll redraft this account again after the development meeting to reflect more specifically what we will be doing in the immediate year. Later Mike Fischer


http://ehrafworldcultures.yale.edu From Carol Ember: Doug--You are going to our home page (hraf.yale.edu), not to the eHRAF World Cultures site (ehrafworldcultures.yale.edu). We have not yet put an exportable SCCS list on our home page. We hope to do so within a couple of weeks. Did you talk to Paula Manaka at your library? She called today to complain that we shouldn’t give out password to faculty and students at Irvine because the library portal has user resources. And, if you use the temporary password, your usage does not go into the user statistics. Anyway, if you are on campus you should get in just putting in the URL http://ehrafworldcultures.yale.edu in your browser. If that doesn’t work, log into your library portal for online resources and look under eHRAF or HRAF. 1. You will only get an list after you execute a search of some kind in basic or advanced search. 2. The culture results are shown by region and when you open the list you will see a column for samples. 3. You will also see a bar to narrow results. When you click on it you can choose to narrow cultures to the SCCS. 4. When you examine paragraph results by clicking on a culture name you will see a document results list in the upper left with footnotes indicating the SCCS matches. (We have found some errors and will be fixing them shortly.) (Earlier:) Carol Doug—thanks for your note. I may have misspoken when I said 136 SCCS cases of the 296 cultures in eHRAF; it may be slightly less, but it is way beyond the 55 you mentioned. I didn’t count the Basques collection because I don’t think we have any document matches. I have a tentative list of 132 SCCS cases currently in eHRAF, but I’d rather wait for a verified list from our production database before I send it to you. We have about another 10 cases currently being processed. If you want a list of current eHRAF cases, please see http://hraf.yale.edu/online-databases/ehraf-world-cultures/cultures-covered/ Of course I will tell you when the material is up. Now looks more like next week.


Dear Carol, Thanks for this. Please let me know when and where the list is up All the best, Forwarded Message -------- Subject: SCCS and eHRAF Date: Mon, 3 Aug 2015 20:30:21 +0000 From: Ember, Carol <carol.ember@yale.edu> To: Doug White <douglas.white@uci.edu>, Mike Fischer Away (mike@fischer.md) <mike@fischer.md>, Fran Barone (franbarone@googlemail.com) <franbarone@googlemail.com> Dear Doug, I thought I would let you know that we have made progress on letting users know the concordance between eHRAF and the SCCS cases. Hopefully the changes will be up this week on the eHRAF site. There will be three ways a researcher can use the information. First, on the culture results page, the sample field will say "PSF" "SCCS" or "SRS". Second, after executing a search, the user will be able to narrow down to the eHRAF cases for which we have "matching" time and place foci in the SCCS. Third, on the page with the paragraph results, the user will see a footnote for the documents that in our opinion match the SCCS (document results list in upper left corner). I think there are 136 cases at the moment and about 467 documents. --Thats a goodly number! We have eHRAF at UCI and below I reproduce a list below with bold for SCCS We also plan on putting additional information on our home page. Tentatively we plan to have a table probably with the following fields: SCCS id, the time focus, any place focus, the eHRAF name and the document authors, titles, and permalinks for the documents in eHRAF that we considered a match. Fran Barone is going to execute this, so I am copying her. I should just add a caveat that I probably have stricter rules about what a match is, so only some of the documents in your 1989 article are listed as matches. We are showing all the documents though so a user can read further. As I think I told you before, we are working on getting all the SCCS cases in--but it will be a few years. Ultimately, we hope to do more, but I hope you agree that this is progress. I will let you know when it is live. --I certainly agree that his is good progress! Best wishes, Carol http://intersci.ss.uci.edu/wiki/index.php/UCI_eHRAF_list - 55 are bolded for SCCS - is this the full current list for eHRAF? Navigation menu page discussion edit history delete move protect unwatch Douglas R. White talk preferences watchlist contributions log out navigation Main page Recent changes Random page Help search

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