Michael D. Fischer

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Attached is what I think you asked for. 09EmberFischerWileyCompanion-Revised4.mf.docx

  • I righted the diagram that was horizontal. I duplicated this at the end of the paper as in your copy, though I suspect was there for emphasis.
  • I substituted new Figure 3 as well, replacing with a version with only 40 missing SCCS cases, which matches the earlier table relating missing cases. I changed text to reflect this change from 53 missing cases to 40 missing cases.
  • I changed the URLs to the SCCS and HRAF SCCS apps to its new location from lucy, which may be shut down at any moment. I'll try to get these installed today/tomorrow.
  • Please let me know if I misunderstood what needed to be done.

Michael D. Fischer; Stephen Lyon S.M.Lyon; anthrowalla@gmail.com http://fischer.md 250 words

Lilyan macbook file:///Users/douglaswhite/Desktop/Conferences.html

Computer-based Support for Summarization, Classification and Coding in Comparative Ethnographic Research

The re-use value of ethnographic data for comparative research is high, but interoperability between ethnographic sources presents considerable challenges that are very laborious for researchers to address manually. Computer-based tools can currently support some, but not all, of these challenges. Broadly, there are three common types of interoperability: 1) syntactic or structure/format conventions; 2) semantic or meaning/interpretation and 3) pragmatic or situated/contextual interpretation. Specific algorithms and tools to support syntactic conversion to a common format are available. Supporting semantic interoperability is more difficult. One traditional method uses a codebook describing each variable and its possible instantiations in the data set. The most common means of achieving semantic interoperability is through applying metadata. Identifying the pragmatic requirements for data re-use in comparative research goes well beyond simply matching up elements syntactically and semantically, and often is supported through construction of a model within which to commonly represent data from different sources. In this chapter current support for syntactic and semantic data interoperability are briefly reviewed with examples based on open source software. However the most difficult task for the researcher is establishing some level of pragmatic compatibility between sources. The interaction of different ethnographic sources is not a simple matter of identifying and structuring data, but requires some form of common reference suitable for the research objectives for pragmatic interoperability. The chapter examines two computational approaches that can help support establishing some level of pragmatic interoperability between sources; multi-agent modeling and data-mining.

Professor of Anthropological Sciences
School of Anthropology and Conservation
http://kent.ac.uk/sac
Director, Centre for Social Anthropology and Computing
University of Kent at Canterbury
Canterbury CT2 7NR UK
http://csac.anthropology.ac.uk
Vice-President, Human Relations Area Files, Yale University
http://hraf.yale.edu


Dear Doug,
I thought I sent a message to you indicating that I did now have access to World Cultures editorial roles.  
Anyway, I do have access, and am working on a special issue.
Mike 
         anthrowalla@gmail.com   - Michael in Paradise
Michael <m.d.fischer@kent.ac.uk>

Doug: Trying to sort things our from the time I was sick - This was from you, Mike: Very pleased to hear such a good prognosis! I have agreed with Giovanni Bennardo to edit the special issue. And I will be pleased to take over World Cultures for a while as general editor, and help find a successor down the road. If you want I'll talk to Stephen Lyon about taking on Structure and Dynamics, as he may be keen to do so, or recommending someone else to do so.

World Cultures

S&D

Dear Greg,

Thanks. Will keep all that in mind. Doug, I have an account on the system as m.d.fischer, currently registered only for content on Structure and Dynamics. Presumably you just need to add World Cultures to that account (or vice versa as it strikes you ! ).

Mike

Gregory F. Truex Greg

Dear Michael,

(Doug:) I really do not know what is needed to give you credentials (- done.) ((I think Doug arranged my access to the editing of WCeJ)) through someone at UC (that was Doug). ((Mike:) They just entered me as the editor. The system allows submissions to the journal. Alternatively, I could put a submission in myself. ((Doug:)) Once in the system, you have control over which (if any) outside reviewers get a copy, etc. There is a mechanism to strip the submission of identifying info before it is sent, for example. The system is complete with regard to editing functions. But, it is somewhat elaborate. Thus, because of the low volume of submissions (or, because I am a fast forgetter), with each paper I had to go back and relearn the system.

On Sunday, August 21, 2016 8:46 PM, Michael Fischer <M.D.Fischer@kent.ac.uk> wrote:

Dear Doug, I would like to get started on Giovanni's special issue, which he is ready to submit, and would be tidier to use the existing mechanisms. 1) I will need credentials (and any advice you have) for the submission system. Also, 2) I would like to redo the supporting web site for World Cultures to increase functionality and clarity. (The UC site is fine for the journal itself). 3) In the longer run I would like to use HRAF as a supporting institution, at whatever level of distance you are comfortable with or think appropriate. What relationship with UCI needs to be maintained to use the current platform? is this likely to be a problem in future? HRAF would have advantages from a continuity standpoint, since I can integrate backup and maintenance into HRAF processes. 4) I will start a search process for my replacement to take over as editor of World Cultures. Mike Michael D. Fischer

Dear Greg and Doug,

I would like to get started on Giovanni's special issue, which he is ready to submit, and would tidier to use the existing mechanisms.

  • 1) I will need credentials (and any advice you have) for the submission system.

Also,

  • 2) I would like to redo the supporting web site for World Cultures to increase functionality and clarity. (The UC site is fine for the journal itself).
  • 3) In the longer run I would like to use HRAF as a supporting institution, at whatever level of distance you are comfortable with or think appropriate. What relationship with UCI needs to be maintained to use the current platform? is this likely to be a problem in future? HRAF would have advantages from a continuity standpoint, since I can integrate backup and maintenance into HRAF processes.
  • 4) I will start a search process for my replacement to take over as editor of World Cultures.

Mike


dear doug

(re: illness): You are one of the most influential people in my life, on a short list with my father and Paul Stirling. Things would have been very different for me had I not met you - I'd probably be richer, but so much poorer in fact.

from doug:: Thanks for this, Mike. Remembering the class we had together at UTexas ours proved the best teacher/student lasting bond I ever had and a lifelong bond that is the best I have ever had. Glad you poured your talents into anthro to great effect, made all the difference to the field. Am still wobbly so I will let you know if I need more help on the anthro side... We need the younger generation to run our two journals, WCej and S&D. Any thoughts? Greg is leaving WC this month for other pursuits. Dwight is running some special issues but there is still need for a general editor. All the best, big hugs. D.

dear doug

Hope all is well. Am on Rarotonga for another month. Talked to carol and she is happy to continue on both chapters but we can't finish until June.

This is largely related to issues mopping up after the removal of our past Head of School, which left a lot of fallout. I have resisted replacing him as I hope to be out of the place in a year.

Mike

Hraf Research

Michael D. Fischer is an anthropologist who has worked mainly in the Punjab and Swat in Pakistan, and in the Cook Islands, mainly Rarotonga and Atiu. His major interests are in the representation and structure of indigenous knowledge, cultural informatics, and the interrelationships between ideation and the material contexts within which and upon which ideation is expressed.

CSAC - Linked to the HRAF Advanced Research Centers (hrafARC) aims to develop and apply new paradigms for comparative research to address outcomes emerging from human complexity and diversity. hrafARC has an overarching goal of expanding its reach and programs globally and invites other collaborations. The main research center is at the HRAF headquarters in New Haven. There is another research center in Europe.

Fischer is Professor of Anthropological Sciences in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Kent and is currently Director of the Centre for Social Anthropology and Computing, the University of Kent at Canterbury. He is the author of Applications in Computing for Social Anthropologists, Co-Editor for the Ethnographics Gallery, a guest editor for Cybernetics and Systems and the Anthropology editor for Social Science Computer Review.

Editorial Board, Structure and Dynamics: Anthropological and Related Sciences
Invited to Editorial Board, World Cultures at http://escholarship.org/uc/wc_worldcultures

Read, Dwight W. & Michael Fischer. 2004. Kinship Algebra Expert System. Canterbury: Centre for Social Anthropology and Computing. http://kaes.anthrosciences.net

Kinsources Kinship data project

Themes from the ESRC-NSF Anthropological Computing workshop--Doug June 2007 Heaton Road

Recommends

Amazon page ... http://www.amazon.com/Facts-Figures-Pelican-M-Moroney/dp/0140202366 Open Library Page (you can borrow an ebook) https://openlibrary.org/books/OL24206672M/Facts_from_figures

The other book was Lila Gatlin, Information Theory and the Living System, 1972 Columbia U Press.

Google Books page: http://books.google.com/books/about/Information_Theory_and_the_Living_System.html?id=yR

Available from about 30 dollars: http://www.alibris.com/Information-Theory-and-the-Living-System-Lila-Gattin/book/3226934

Will find in a library for you http://www.worldcat.org/title/information-theory-and-the-living-system/oclc/309434

Links

Ethnoecology Research Methods Annotated Bibliography

Methods_links#Kent-Canterbury-CSAC CSAC

Special Issue editor, Configuring Anthropology, Social Science Computer Review 2006

Articles Select this article

  • Michael D. Fischer, Stephen M. Lyon, Daniel Sosna, and David Henig

Harmonizing Diversity: Tuning Anthropological Research to Complexity1 Social Science Computer Review February 2013 31: 3-15, first published on September 24, 2012 doi:10.1177/0894439312455311 Abstract Full Text (PDF) References Request Permissions

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  • Dwight Read, Michael Fischer, and Murray Leaf

What Are Kinship Terminologies, and Why Do We Care? A Computational Approach to Analyzing Symbolic Domains Social Science Computer Review February 2013 31: 16-44, first published on September 24, 2012 doi:10.1177/0894439312455914 Abstract Full Text (PDF) References Request Permissions

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  • Stephen M. Lyon

Networks and Kinship: Formal Models of Alliance, Descent, and Inheritance in a Pakistani Punjabi Village Social Science Computer Review February 2013 31: 45-55, first published on September 20, 2012 doi:10.1177/0894439312453275 Abstract Full Text (PDF) References Request Permissions

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  • Daniel Sosna, Patrik Galeta, Ladislav Šmejda, Vladimír Sladek, and Jaroslav Bruzek

Burials and Graphs: Relational Approach to Mortuary Analysis Social Science Computer Review February 2013 31: 56-70, first published on September 20, 2012 doi:10.1177/0894439312453277 Abstract Full Text (PDF) References Request Permissions

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  • Duncan Sayer and Michelle Wienhold

A GIS-Investigation of Four Early Anglo-Saxon Cemeteries: Ripley’s K-function Analysis of Spatial Groupings Amongst Graves Social Science Computer Review February 2013 31: 71-89, first published on September 20, 2012 doi:10.1177/0894439312453276 Abstract Full Text (PDF) References Request Permissions

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Expect the Unexpected? Testing for Minimally Counterintuitive (MCI) Bias in the Transmission of Contemporary Legends: A Computational Phylogenetic Approach Social Science Computer Review February 2013 31: 90-102, first published on September 25, 2012 doi:10.1177/0894439312453567 Abstract Full Text (PDF) References Request Permissions

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  • Kira Eghbal-Azar and Thomas Widlok

Potentials and Limitations of Mobile Eye Tracking in Visitor Studies: Evidence From Field Research at Two Museum Exhibitions in Germany Social Science Computer Review February 2013 31: 103-118, first published on October 31, 2012 doi:10.1177/0894439312453565 Abstract Full Text (PDF) References Request Permissions

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  • Clarence C. Gravlee, H. Russell Bernard, Chad R. Maxwell, and Aryeh Jacobsohn

Mode Effects in Free-list Elicitation: Comparing Oral, Written, and Web-based Data Collection Social Science Computer Review February 2013 31: 119-132, first published on September 10, 2012 doi:10.1177/0894439312455312 Abstract Full Text (PDF) References Request Permissions Reports and Communications Select this article

  • Antonio M. Battro

One Laptop Per Child: Comments on Jeffrey James's Critique Social Science Computer Review February 2013 31: 133-135, doi:10.1177/0894439311421752 Abstract Full Text (PDF) References Request Permissions

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  • Jeffrey James

Reply to Battro on the One Laptop Per Child Social Science Computer Review February 2013 31: 136-138, doi:10.1177/0894439311421753 Abstract Full Text (PDF) References Request Permissions

Recent Publications

Michael D. Fischer, Stephen M. Lyon, Daniel Sosna, David Henig. 2013. Harmonizing Diversity: Turning Anthropological Research to Complexity. Social Science Computer Review 31(1):3-15. pub.com/JournalsPermission Permissions
) Social Science Computer Review 31(1 Special Issue
2006 Cultural Agents: Changing the World in the Community of Minds Cybernetics and Systems Research. [1]
2006 Cultural Agents: A Community of Minds Lecture Notes in Computer Science 3963 ESAW 2005 259-274, Springer [2]
2005 Culture and Indigenous Knowledge Systems: Emergent order and the internal regulation of shared symbolic systems Cybernetics and Systems 36(8): 735-752. [3]
2006 Arranging Marriage in an Urban Community in Pakistan: 1982-2000 Contemporary South Asia 15(4):325-339 [4]