Native America

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Geoff Magnum: Native America Project: Nearly 30,000 References

Dear Native America Studies Folk,

This is about as simple as I can make it for you to learn about nearly 30,000 references for Indian-White relations 1500-1900 plus earlier archaeology and the present status of Native America. Click here: ftp://puttzone:puttzone@ftp.puttingzoneclinics.com. Once the ftp server files appear, download all the IndianMaps KML files to your hard drive and then open them in the Google Earth viewer. That's about 15,000 live web links and historical references located on the ground where the history occurred: villages, towns, paths, trails, battles, maps, land cessions, treaties, portraits, reservations, and much more!

The Native America Project online library is here: Native America Project online research library

This resource now includes over 13,360 references, thousands of which are available online in full text.

This resource is without question the largest database and the most useful collection of historical information about Indian-White relations ever compiled. I know, because I checked.

To share this with your students, you might like to forward this email or send them this digital poster:

Cheers!

IMG_1722_200x200_38k.jpg

Geoff Mangum

518 Woodlawn Avenue Greensboro NC USA 27401 +1 (336) 340-9079 "cell in me pocket" Geoff Mangum's Guide to Native American History Facebook: Native America Project on Google Earth Native America Project online research library geoff.mangum@gmail.com to my Droid cell for immediate reply


Standing Bear's Footsteps

Native Communities Utilize Interactive Learning Tools from Standing Bear Documentary

AIM

Edmunds, R. David (Russell David). 2001. The new warriors Native American leaders since 1900. Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press

Laguna Pueblo

Grab day

Digital Publications

SAR

http://www.southwestcrossroads.org/
  • Patricia Roberts Clark. Tribal Names of the Americas: Spelling Variants and Alternative Forms, Cross-Referenced
Wadadokado = Northern Paiute (Google eBook)

first Native American TV channel

Native American DVDs

September 28, 2011 12:23, 28 September 2011 (PDT)12:23, 28 September 2011 (PDT)12:23, 28 September 2011 (PDT)12:23, 28 September 2011 (PDT)12:23, 28 September 2011 (PDT)12:23, 28 September 2011 (PDT)12:23, 28 September 2011 (PDT)12:23, 28 September 2011 (PDT)12:23, 28 September 2011 (PDT)12:23, 28 September 2011 (PDT)12:23, 28 September 2011 (PDT)12:23, 28 September 2011 (PDT)12:23, 28 September 2011 (PDT)12:23, 28 September 2011 (PDT)12:23, 28 September 2011 (PDT)12:23, 28 September 2011 (PDT)

For Immediate Release:

Historical Native American Channel Launches in Southern California

San Bernardino, Calif.: The first Native American TV channel in the United States went on the air September 25 with the launch of FNX: First Nations Experience Television [1]. FNX is a new multimedia platform featuring authentic voices and stories reflecting the reality of the Native American experience and that of Indigenous peoples worldwide. FNX is a 24/7 high definition (HD) multi-platform digital media vehicle created through a partnership between the San Manuel Band of Mission Indians and KVCR, a

PBS member station located in California's Inland Empire.

"This marks the birth of an innovative project that has been in the works for 7 years now," said Larry Ciecalone, President/CEO of KVCR/FNX. "The FNX Channel [2] launched at 7:00 p.m. in Southern California on KVCR 24.2 digital. It is a TV channel dedicated to the Native American experience and the first of its kind in the nation. We developed this concept with our founding partner, San Manuel Band of Serrano Mission Indians. KVCR is pleased to offer this experience to Southern California viewers and will launch the channel nationally next year."

FNX launched in Southern California, the second largest market in the United States, with a potential audience of 18 million viewers. Within one year, FNX plans to expand and lead the way as a producer (via the Internet and over-the air, satellite and

cable broadcast systems) of authentic First Nations storytelling. Programs will
include varying genres including documentaries, sports, feature film, drama series,

news and comedy.

"Today, Indian Country can take pride in this first major step toward establishing a communications institution to secure a national and international presence utilizing the television medium--a communications medium that all Native and Indigenous people can utilize to tell our stories about our cultures and history," said San Manuel Vice Chairwoman Lynn Valbuena. As members of the World Indigenous Television Broadcast Network, FNX [3] is the first multimedia venture in the United States created to accurately educate the general public about Native American realities.

"Native America is the foundation for our nation. Much of our culture, language,

laws and place are based on traditional Native American cultures and practice,"
said Charles Fox, FNX Executive Director and Chief Operations Officer. "For the
first time in our nation's history, there will be a place where all people can 

discover, appreciate and re-examine our common bond and shared values. That place is FNX: First Nations Experience [4]."

For more information, visit:http://fnx.org [5]

For more on FNX's partners, visit: www.sanmanuel-nsn.gov [6] and http://kvcr.org [7]

About NAPT

Native American Public Telecommunications, Inc. (NAPT), a non-profit 501(c)(3) which receives major funding from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, shares Native stories with the world through support of the creation, promotion and distribution of Native media. Founded in 1977, through various media-public television, public radio and the Internet--NAPT brings awareness of Indian and Alaska Native issues.

  • NAPT operates AIROS Audio

[8], offering downloadable podcasts with Native filmmakers, musicians and Tribal leaders.

  • VisionMaker

[9] is the premier source for quality Native American educational and home videos. All aspects of our programs encourage the involvement of young people to learn more about careers in the media--to be the next generation of storytellers. NAPT is located at the University of Nebraska- Lincoln. NAPT offers student employment, internships and fellowships. Reaching the general public and the global market is the ultimate goal for the dissemination of Native-produced media. For more information, visit

www.nativetelecom.org

[10].

Download the Full Press Release:PDF [11]

Contact: Valerie Taliman · vtaliman@fnx.org [12]

Kenneth Shoji · kshoji@sanmanuel.com [13] 12:23, 28 September 2011 (PDT)12:23, 28 September 2011 (PDT)12:23, 28 September 2011 (PDT)12:23, 28 September 2011 (PDT)12:23, 28 September 2011 (PDT)12:23, 28 September 2011 (PDT)12:23, 28 September 2011 (PDT)12:23, 28 September 2011 (PDT)12:23, 28 September 2011 (PDT)12:23, 28 September 2011 (PDT)12:23, 28 September 2011 (PDT)12:23, 28 September 2011 (PDT)12:23, 28 September 2011 (PDT)12:23, 28 September 2011 (PDT)12:23, 28 September 2011 (PDT)12:23, 28 September 2011 (PDT)

Donate Now [14] 12:23, 28 September 2011 (PDT)12:23, 28 September 2011 (PDT)12:23, 28 September 2011 (PDT)12:23, 28 September 2011 (PDT)12:23, 28 September 2011 (PDT)12:23, 28 September 2011 (PDT)12:23, 28 September 2011 (PDT)12:23, 28 September 2011 (PDT)12:23, 28 September 2011 (PDT)12:23, 28 September 2011 (PDT)12:23, 28 September 2011 (PDT)12:23, 28 September 2011 (PDT)12:23, 28 September 2011 (PDT)12:23, 28 September 2011 (PDT)12:23, 28 September 2011 (PDT)12:23, 28 September 2011 (PDT)

Find Us On These Sites

  • NAPT on Facebook

[15]NAPT on Twitter [16]AIROS and NAPT on MySpace [17]NAPT

  • Videos on YouTube

[18]NAPT

  • Videos on Blip TV

[19]View and Share on Your Site Our News Feed [20] 12:23, 28 September 2011 (PDT)12:23, 28 September 2011 (PDT)12:23, 28 September 2011 (PDT)12:23, 28 September 2011 (PDT)12:23, 28 September 2011 (PDT)12:23, 28 September 2011 (PDT)12:23, 28 September 2011 (PDT)12:23, 28 September 2011 (PDT)12:23, 28 September 2011 (PDT)12:23, 28 September 2011 (PDT)12:23, 28 September 2011 (PDT)12:23, 28 September 2011 (PDT)12:23, 28 September 2011 (PDT)12:23, 28 September 2011 (PDT)12:23, 28 September 2011 (PDT)12:23, 28 September 2011 (PDT)

NAPT Receives Funding from

CPB [21]

12:23, 28 September 2011 (PDT)12:23, 28 September 2011 (PDT)12:23, 28 September 2011 (PDT)12:23, 28 September 2011 (PDT)12:23, 28 September 2011 (PDT)12:23, 28 September 2011 (PDT)12:23, 28 September 2011 (PDT)12:23, 28 September 2011 (PDT)12:23, 28 September 2011 (PDT)12:23, 28 September 2011 (PDT)12:23, 28 September 2011 (PDT)12:23, 28 September 2011 (PDT)12:23, 28 September 2011 (PDT)12:23, 28 September 2011 (PDT)12:23, 28 September 2011 (PDT)12:23, 28 September 2011 (PDT) Forward email http://ui.constantcontact.com/sa/fwtf.jsp?llr=8fvnpcbab&m=1100668654779&ea=douglas.white@uci.edu&a=1107874770745

Native America project

Receipt of Email 1

Subject:   Native America Project 
From:   "Geoff Mangum" <geoff@puttingzone.com> 
Date:   Thu, December 23, 2010 1:41 pm 
To:   "Doug White" <douglas.white@uci.edu>  

Native America Project

Dear Doug,

I sure could use your help! Several years ago I began the massive "Native America Project" -- an unrestrained attempt to document the dispossession of the original peoples of the North American continent between 1492 and 1900 in the form of Google Maps and Google Earth "placemarks". These placemarks include Native American towns and villages, tribal areas, archaeological sites, battles, trails, colonial and Indian-war forts, missions and schools, settler explorations, and many other aspects of the 400-year history.

At present, this project includes over 10,000 placemarks filled with historical texts, images, maps, paintings, biographies, video clips and other web objects. Of special note are the many hundreds of online history texts located to the relevant area (e.g., St Augustine FL for Spanish military and mission towns, eastern Massachussetts for King Philip's War, etc.) -- documenting in free full-text online books the many tribes, settlements, missions, wars, biographies, and the like from hard-to-locate references from the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries.

The reason I am contacting you is to enlist your support from the establishment of academia to make as accurate and complete as possible this project and to further develop the information into many spin-off educational tools for Native American communities and the mainstream educational system and tourism / publications industry. Sample projects include state-by-state guides, GPS navigation points of interest, interactive history timelines, and much more! The Project requires some basic funding and about 2-3 more years of development.

You can help by examining the current state of the Project and imagining the possibilities of helping the Native American heritage. Perhaps your students and colleagues may find the concentration of information valuable or at least interesting. Attached are the live links to the many Google Maps. Because the "Maps" come in separate pages, they are not a good solution, as the placemarks must be displayed all at once as with Google Earth.

In order to open all the maps in Google Earth for simultaneous viewing, it is necessary to download the "KML" file from each map and separately open this KML file in Google Earth. To save you the trouble of the many downloads (performed by selecting "View in Google Earth" from each map, to download the KML to your computer and then open the downloaded file in GE), I have downloaded and collected all the KML files at this location: Indian Maps KML. Please visit this link and then download all these small files; then open Google Earth in your computer and load all of these KML files ("open file") in GE and have a look. I think you will see the good that can come of this with a little support from you and others.

Here are the Google Maps:

Geoff Mangum's Guide to Native American History -- main website

Indian Towns and Villages

Indian Towns and Villages (2)

Indian Tribes of America

Indian Tribes of America (2)

Indian Tribes with Federal Recognition

Indian Tribes with Federal Recognition (2)

Alaska Native sites

Canadian First Nations

Indian Archaeology Sites and Museums

Indian History Museums and Tourism

European Exploration and Settlement <p> Early Maps with Indian Sites

Early Indian Paths and Settler Roads

American Indian Wars

American Indian Wars (2)

US-Canadian Forts 1500-1900

US-Canadian Forts 1500-1900 (2)

US-Canadian Forts 1500-1900 (3)

Indian Fur Trade and Fur Trading Posts

Indian Missions

Indian Schools

Indian Biography

Indian Online Bibliography

Modern era maps:

Indian Powwows and Conferences

Indian Casinos and Gaming

I hope to hear back from you soon!

Cheers!

Geoff Mangum</p>

Geoff Mangum's Guide to Native American History

518 Woodlawn Ave
Greensboro NC USA 27401

Get Skype and call me for free.
"geoffmangum" Skype ID
001 (336) 340-9079 "cell in me pocket"
geoff.mangum@gmail.com to my Droid cell

Reply to Email 1

Re: Native America Project From: drwhite@uci.edu Date: Sat, December 25, 2010 8:32 am To: "Geoff Mangum" <geoff@puttingzone.com> Options: View Full Header | View Printable Version | Download this as a file | Add to Address Book | View Message Details

Dear Geoff Your Native America project is an immense and invaluable scholarly work, and I congratulate you on it. Glad you contacted me; I did a PhD on Indigenous Americans of the central states with advisor E. A. Hoebel and an article on the Natchez with Murdock. Your documentation is what is needed to bring to public attention the dispossession of indigenous peoples and the extent of civilian and military violence against them, as well as background on current tribal territories and the host of google map and google earth and placemarks on towns and villages, tribal areas, archaeological sites, battles, trails, colonial and Indian-war forts, missions and schools, and settler explorations. Some of my graduate students have used KML for documentation in other parts of the world. I would be happy to help advise on helping to document the Native American heritage. The electronic journal I founded published Joseph Jorgenson’s Western Indians dataset which might be of use. Joe died a few years ago (2008) but was an advisor in the political struggles of various tribes such as Navaho. I host a wiki that addresses issues and data on the social sciences. As a trial baloon to bring your site to broader attention, I drafted a page that replicates your email, with the links in mediawiki format, and then listed it as a major contribution to the wiki. You will find those links at http://intersci.ss.uci.edu/wiki/index.php/Category:Major_contributors and of course it is yours (once you sign in) to edit or delete, or ask me to edit. Sincerely, and Merry Christmas - have a good new year, and keep up the great work


Doug White http://intersci.ss.uci.edu/wiki/index.php/DW_home

p.s. what led you to me and how many other scholars or helpers do you have? You've done a huge amount of work

Receipt of Email 2

Native America Project From: "Geoff Mangum" <geoff@puttingzone.com> Date: Mon, February 14, 2011 4:24 pm To: "Doug White" <douglas.white@uci.edu> Options: View Full Header | View Printable Version | Download this as a file | Add to Address Book | View Message Details | View as HTML

Native America Project Dear Doug,


I am writing again after the holidays, because many of you were on break and may have missed the announcement. Several years ago I began the massive "Native America Project" -- an unrestrained attempt to document the dispossession of the original peoples of the North American continent between 1492 and 1900 in the form of Google Maps and Google Earth "placemarks". These placemarks include �Native American towns and villages, tribal areas, archaeological sites, battles, trails, colonial and Indian-war forts, missions and schools, settler explorations, and many other aspects of the 400-year history.

At present, this project includes over 15,000 placemarks filled with historical texts, images, maps, paintings, biographies, video clips and other web objects. The collection has grown by nearly 50% in the past month alone!

Of special note are the many hundreds of online history texts located to the relevant area (e.g., St Augustine FL for Spanish military and mission towns, eastern Massachusetts for King Philip's War, etc.) -- documenting in free full-text online books the many tribes, settlements, missions, wars, biographies, and the like from hard-to-locate references from the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries. The collection currently includes about 2,000 online texts resources.

The reason I am contacting you is to enlist your support from the establishment of academia to make as accurate and complete as possible this project and to further develop the information into many spin-off educational tools for Native American communities and the mainstream educational system and tourism / publications industry. Sample projects include state-by-state guides, GPS navigation points of interest, interactive history timelines, and much more! The Project requires some basic funding and about 2-3 more years of development.

You can help by examining the current state of the Project and imagining the possibilities of helping the Native American heritage. Perhaps your students and colleagues may find the concentration of information valuable or at least interesting. Attached are the live links to the many Google Maps. Because the "Maps" come in separate pages, they are not a good solution, as the placemarks need to be displayed all at once as with Google Earth to fully appreciate the breadth of the subject.

HOW TO: Viewing each Google Map separately is not much fun. Google Earth is great! In order to open all the maps in Google Earth for simultaneous viewing, it is necessary to first download, install and launch the Google Earth viewer (<a href="http://www.google.com/earth/download/ge/agree.html" target=_new>free here</a>), then download the "KML" files for the 33 maps as a batch (<a href="https://public.me.com/geoff.mangum" target=_new>free here</a>) and then open the kml batch all at once in Google Earth using the GE menu File>Open and selecting all the kml files. If you will follow these two simple steps, I think you will see the good that can come of this with a little support from you and others.

I have also created a Facebook page for the Native America Project to post information about updates and changes in the project and to facilitate communication about assistance andusing the resource. The Facebook page is here: <a href="http://www.facebook.com/pages/Native-America-Project/184962054849560" target_new>Native America Project</a>. There is also a free poster for placement on your office or department announcement board or for sending out to friends as an email attachment so others can learn about the resource (<a href="http://puttingzone.com/Info/NAP_Poster.pdf">Native America Project free poster in pdf format</a>).

Here are the Google Maps:

<a href="http://puttingzone.com/indians.html">Geoff Mangum's Guide to Native American History -- main website</a>

<a href="http://maps.google.com/maps/ms?hl=en&gl=us&ptab=2&ie=UTF8&view=map&oe=UTF8&start=400&num=100&msa=0&msid=206350843187803166258.00045dd864c5a6eafcdb7&ll=39.842286,-104.150391&spn=33.763181,76.640625&z=4" target="_blank">Federal Indian Tribes
(approx. 420)</a>

<a href="http://maps.google.com/maps/ms?hl=en&gl=us&ptab=2&ie=UTF8&view=map&oe=UTF8&start=400&num=100&msa=0&msid=206350843187803166258.000473f25d98c84cb0418&ll=61.48076,-154.335937&spn=21.36948,76.640625&z=4" target="_blank">Alaska Native Communities
(approx. 250)</a>

<a href="http://maps.google.com/maps/ms?hl=en&gl=us&ptab=2&ie=UTF8&view=map&oe=UTF8&start=400&num=100&msa=0&msid=206350843187803166258.00045f15a519781a64a93&z=4" target="_blank">Canadian First Nations, Inuits and Metis
(approx. 850)</a>

<a href="http://www.google.com/maps/ms?ie=UTF8&hl=en&t=p&oe=UTF8&start=0&num=200&msa=0&msid=117501328347512073832.00046d0082edee630ef1c&z=4" target="_blank">Indian Towns and Villages 1500-1900 (1)
(approx. 650, includes State, Federal, and non-recognized modern tribes)</a>

<a href="http://maps.google.com/maps/ms?hl=en&gl=us&ptab=2&ie=UTF8&num=100&start=25&view=map&msa=0&msid=206350843187803166258.00046db544591b6fbca1a&z=4" target="_blank">Indian Towns and Villages 1500-1900 (2)
(approx. 550)</a>

<a href="http://maps.google.com/maps/ms?hl=en&gl=us&ptab=2&ie=UTF8&num=100&start=25&view=map&msa=0&msid=206350843187803166258.00045c4e20d2339e4a8cf&ll=29.152161,-83.935547&spn=38.091224,76.640625&z=4" target="_blank">Indian Towns and Villages 1500-1900 (3)
(approx. 1050)</a>

<a href="http://maps.google.com/maps/ms?hl=en&gl=us&ptab=2&ie=UTF8&num=100&start=25&view=map&msa=0&msid=206350843187803166258.000472e91466236707119&ll=37.125286,-87.93457&spn=17.590223,38.320312&z=4" target="_blank">Indian Towns and Villages 1500-1900 (4)
(approx. 500)</a>

<a href="http://maps.google.com/maps/ms?hl=en&gl=us&ptab=2&ie=UTF8&view=map&oe=UTF8&start=400&num=100&msa=0&msid=206350843187803166258.00046c70b659ae98db0c2&z=4" target="_blank">Indian Archaeology Museums and Sites
(approx. 400)</a>

<a href="http://maps.google.com/maps/ms?hl=en&gl=us&ptab=2&ie=UTF8&view=map&oe=UTF8&start=800&num=100&msa=0&msid=206350843187803166258.00046c8dbaef19a260d0b&z=4" target="_blank">Indian History Museums and Tourism
(approx. 800)</a>

<a href="http://maps.google.com/maps/ms?hl=en&gl=us&ptab=2&ie=UTF8&view=map&oe=UTF8&start=800&num=100&msa=0&msid=206350843187803166258.00046dc27543e62478078&z=4" target="_blank">Indian Schools
(approx. 650 marks)</a>

<a href="http://maps.google.com/maps/ms?hl=en&gl=us&ptab=2&ie=UTF8&view=map&oe=UTF8&start=800&num=100&msa=0&msid=206350843187803166258.00045d6ad36d883af4f47&z=4" target="_blank">Indian Missions
(approx. 500)</a>

<a href="http://maps.google.com/maps/ms?hl=en&gl=us&ptab=2&ie=UTF8&view=map&oe=UTF8&start=300&num=100&msa=0&msid=206350843187803166258.00046d7d6aeda486ec662&ll=36.173357,-95.009766&spn=35.392303,76.640625&z=4" target="_blank">European Exploration and Settlement
(approx. 350)</a>

<a href="http://maps.google.com/maps/ms?hl=en&gl=us&ptab=2&ie=UTF8&view=map&oe=UTF8&start=500&num=100&msa=0&msid=206350843187803166258.00046d7d03be77ec8762c&z=5" target="_blank">Early Indian Paths and Settler Roads (1)
(approx. 550)</a>

<a href="http://maps.google.com/maps/ms?hl=en&gl=us&ptab=2&ie=UTF8&view=map&oe=UTF8&start=100&num=100&msa=0&msid=206350843187803166258.00049c26192ec13e1e7e4&ll=34.849875,-100.107422&spn=18.096842,38.320312&z=4" target="_blank" class="style16">Early Indian Paths and Settler Roads (2)
(approx. 175)</a>

<a href="http://maps.google.com/maps/ms?hl=en&gl=us&ptab=2&ie=UTF8&view=map&oe=UTF8&start=100&num=100&msa=0&msid=206350843187803166258.00046d6a2ee9332b18c68&z=4" target="_blank">Early Maps with Indian Sites
(approx. 1000)</a>

<a href="http://maps.google.com/maps/ms?hl=en&gl=us&ptab=2&ie=UTF8&view=map&oe=UTF8&start=100&num=100&msa=0&msid=206350843187803166258.00045f28135b03e4f6704&ll=45.767523,-91.845703&spn=30.826482,76.640625&z=4" target="_blank">Indian Fur Trade & Trading Posts
(approx. 500)</a>

<a href="http://maps.google.com/maps/ms?hl=en&gl=us&ptab=2&ie=UTF8&view=map&oe=UTF8&start=100&num=100&msa=0&msid=206350843187803166258.00045e238756df3bf3d45&z=4" target="_blank">American and Canadian Forts (1)
(approx. 1,450)</a>

<a href="http://maps.google.com/maps/ms?hl=en&gl=us&ptab=2&ie=UTF8&view=map&oe=UTF8&start=100&num=100&msa=0&msid=206350843187803166258.00046dcb11b3736e3949e&z=4" target="_blank">American and Canadian Forts (2)
(approx. 75)</a>

<a href="http://maps.google.com/maps/ms?hl=en&gl=us&ptab=2&ie=UTF8&view=map&oe=UTF8&start=100&num=100&msa=0&msid=206350843187803166258.000472fd65fd1d9591cc7&z=4" target="_blank" class="style16">American and Canadian Forts (3)
(approx. 200)</a>

<a href="http://maps.google.com/maps/ms?hl=en&gl=us&ptab=2&ie=UTF8&view=map&oe=UTF8&start=100&num=100&msa=0&msid=206350843187803166258.00049a083cc51f45b3e54&ll=38.85682,-100.371094&spn=17.185885,38.320312&z=4" target="_blank" class="style16">American and Canadian Forts (4)
(approx. 250)</a>

<a href="http://maps.google.com/maps/ms?hl=en&gl=us&ptab=2&ie=UTF8&view=map&oe=UTF8&start=100&num=100&msa=0&msid=206350843187803166258.00045d6cb83aef5970bbb&ll=37.614231,-109.467773&spn=17.477677,38.320312&z=4" target="_blank">North American Indian Wars (1)
(approx. 400)
<p class="style16"><a href="http://maps.google.com/maps/ms?hl=en&gl=us&ptab=2&ie=UTF8&view=map&oe=UTF8&start=100&num=100&msa=0&msid=206350843187803166258.00046de5568f8f689ebfd&z=4" target="_blank">North American Indian Wars (2)
(approx. 350)</a> </p> <p>The Online Bibliography, about 2,000 items, is here:</p> <p><a href="http://maps.google.com/maps/ms?hl=en&gl=us&ptab=2&ie=UTF8&view=map&oe=UTF8&start=100&num=100&msa=0&msid=206350843187803166258.00048c341e50ff4a30adc&ll=39.97712,-99.580078&spn=33.70051,76.640625&z=4" target="_blank" class="style16">Indian Online Bibliography (1)
(approx. 1000)</a></p><p><a href="http://maps.google.com/maps/ms?hl=en&gl=us&ptab=2&ie=UTF8&view=map&oe=UTF8&start=100&num=100&msa=0&msid=206350843187803166258.0004983ac9dc1b57115a6&ll=38.272689,-98.4375&spn=34.47819,76.640625&z=4" target="_blank" class="style16">Indian Online Bibliography (2)
(approx. 550)</a></p> <p><a href="http://maps.google.com/maps/ms?hl=en&gl=us&ptab=2&ie=UTF8&view=map&oe=UTF8&start=100&num=100&msa=0&msid=206350843187803166258.000499aeecd55160e89e0&z=4" class="style16">Indian Online Bibliography (3)
(approx. 375)</a></p> <p>Modern era maps:</p> <p><p class="style16"><a href="http://maps.google.com/maps/ms?hl=en&gl=us&ptab=2&ie=UTF8&view=map&oe=UTF8&start=100&num=100&msa=0&msid=206350843187803166258.00045d7f36e86a5c274ba&z=4" target="_blank">Indian Powwows, Festivals and Conferences
(approx. 75)</a></p> <p><a href="http://maps.google.com/maps/ms?hl=en&gl=us&ptab=2&ie=UTF8&view=map&oe=UTF8&start=100&num=100&msa=0&msid=206350843187803166258.00045df7d99ba1d0c071f&z=4" target="_blank">Indian Casinos and Gaming
(approx. 600)</a>
</p> <p>I hope to hear back from you soon!</p> <p>Cheers! </p> Geoff Mangum</p> <a href="http://puttingzone.com/indians.html">Geoff Mangum's Guide to Native American History</a> <p> 518 Woodlawn Ave
Greensboro NC USA 27401 </p> <p>Get Skype and call me for free.
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