Peter Bearman

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<delio.mugnolo@uni-ulm.de>

Dec 2017

Peter Bearman On Wed, Mar 14, 2012 at 11:25 PM, Doug White <drwhite@uci.edu> wrote:

   Interesting (the Euros have lots of money these days). I would rather have 2 of these guys some to UCSD and meet with our Complex Networks group and the Computer Science labs, thats where I do most of network stuff now. Being somebody's lab rat is not my idea of fun. I did that for Notre Dame but nothing came of it. Meanwhile my causality project is really churning. Let me know if you get to the point where you want to talk to my good and wise friend Zandy Moore who knows USC inside and out. I've got his new phone # as he moved to about 40 miles to the NW of USC and is soon to retire.
   have fun
   we had a great talk with Alessandra about the bicameral m/f view of the Emirates.
   On 3/14/12 5:30 PM, peter bearman wrote:
   Dear Delio,
   That is an interesting proposal.  As much as I might wish to spend that kind of time I think it is impossible.  But the person that I think is absolutely THE BEST for you -- if you were lucky enough to get him (and his wife, Lilyan, also brilliant) to visit is Douglas White of UC Irvine.  Here is his web page,
    http://eclectic.ss.uci.edu/~drwhite/
    There is no one in the discipline better at resonating widely and creating new thoughts.
    Peter
    On Wed, Mar 14, 2012 at 5:12 PM, <delio.mugnolo@uni-ulm.de> wrote:
       Dear Dr. Bearman,
        I am a mathematician currently working at the University of Ulm, Germany. Your name was suggested to me by Dr. Monika Krause, a sociologist at the University of London.
        I am writing to you for an academic reason. You may possibly know the ZIF (Zentrum für Interdisziplinäre Forschung) based in Bielefeld, Germany. The ZIF is the University of Bielfeld's IAS and a leading institution in the landscape of Germany sociology. Through the co-funding of the University of Bielefeld and the regional government of Lower Saxony, the ZIF has been supporting since the 1970s a few highly interdisciplinary research groups every year. In fact, I myself am currently submitting an application, jointly with two colleagues (Fatihcan Atay at the MPI in Leipzig and Pavel Kurasov at the University of Stockholm), on the mathematical analysis of networks in the physical, biomedical and social sciences. We have passed the first selection and are currently preparing the full version of the application.
        Should our proposal be approved, we would receive a good budget to set up a research group to be based at the ZIF between 2012 and 2015: the first year we would be essentially preparatory, the third would be devoted to conclude the work we already started, while during the second year the three organizers would be resident at the ZIF and would be working together for six months. All of the PIs are mathematical physicists, but the idea of ​​the project is to use mathematics only as a common language and to rather devote most of our attention to the role played by networks in other sciences. In comparison to what has already been so successfully done over the last 15 years in the field of complex networks, we would like to use some harder (or, at least, less soft) mathematical tools: essentially, symmetric graph theory, functional analysis and differential or difference equations, to complement statistical methods.
        Much of the group's budget would be devoted to invite colleagues (needless to say: colleagues active in potentially far away areas) with whom we would discuss and (try to) find contact points: we would particularly like to meet economists, ecologists and sociologists. Admittedly, our research plan is very speculative, just like almost every truly interdisciplinary research. Though, it is - I am convinced - potentially very interesting and innovative. It would be very interesting to discuss with you, both because your own research topics are of course tightly related to those of our project in Bielefeld and also because (not less important) your extensive experience with interdisciplinary research can teach us a lot (although the theory of interdisciplinarity itself will not be a research topic for us).
        Specifically, my proposal to you is that (assuming that our research project is approved) you come to Bielefeld and spend with us a few weeks (two to four, say, depending on your personal commitments) at a time suitable to you between October, 2013 and March, 2014. You would be living with us in the campus of the ZIF and discuss with the "fellows" present at the time - likely a half-dozen, working on various aspects of human sciences. I realize this is all terribly premature (this is something that would begin at earliest in one year and a half), but the ZIF is interested in a possible core of "fellows" who accept to participate - even just in principle, at this early stage. The point is that these names may clarify the approach and the disciplinary spectrum of our research project.
        If you are unwilling or unable to accept our invitation, I would be very grateful if you could suggest to me some colleagues of yours who might, in your opinion, be interested in our project.
        Thank you for your attention.
        Yours sincerely,
        Delio Mugnolo

ULM 2012

yes, i can imagine it might not be fun, so when he writes, just decline.... well, if you feel like sending me Zandy Moore's phone number i may call him. thanks peter

On Wed, Mar 14, 2012 at 11:25 PM, Doug White <drwhite@uci.edu> wrote:

   Interesting (the Euros have lots of money these days). I would rather have 2 of these guys some to UCSD and meet with our Complex Networks group and the Computer Science labs, thats where I do most of network stuff now. Being somebody's lab rat is not my idea of fun. I did that for Notre Dame but nothing came of it. Meanwhile my causality project is really churning. Let me know if you get to the point where you want to talk to my good and wise friend Zandy Moore who knows USC inside and out. I've got his new phone # as he moved to about 40 miles to the NW of USC and is soon to retire.
   have fun
   we had a great talk with Alessandra about the bicameral m/f view of the Emirates.
   On 3/14/12 5:30 PM, peter bearman wrote:

> Dear Delio, > > That is an interesting proposal. As much as I might wish to spend that kind of time I think it is impossible. But the person that I think is absolutely THE BEST for you -- if you were lucky enough to get him (and his wife, Lilyan, also brilliant) to visit is Douglas White of UC Irvine. Here is his web page,

    http://eclectic.ss.uci.edu/~drwhite/
    There is no one in the discipline better at resonating widely and creating new thoughts.
    Peter

> > On Wed, Mar 14, 2012 at 5:12 PM, <delio.mugnolo@uni-ulm.de> wrote: > > Dear Dr. Bearman, > > I am a mathematician currently working at the University of Ulm, Germany. Your name was suggested to me by Dr. Monika Krause, a sociologist at the University of London.

        I am writing to you for an academic reason. You may possibly know the ZIF (Zentrum für Interdisziplinäre Forschung) based in Bielefeld, Germany. The ZIF is the University of Bielfeld's IAS and a leading institution in the landscape of Germany sociology. Through the co-funding of the University of Bielefeld and the regional government of Lower Saxony, the ZIF has been supporting since the 1970s a few highly interdisciplinary research groups every year. In fact, I myself am currently submitting an application, jointly with two colleagues (Fatihcan Atay at the MPI in Leipzig and Pavel Kurasov at the University of Stockholm), on the mathematical analysis of networks in the physical, biomedical and social sciences. We have passed the first selection and are currently preparing the full version of the application.
        Should our proposal be approved, we would receive a good budget to set up a research group to be based at the ZIF between 2012 and 2015: the first year we would be essentially preparatory, the third would be devoted to conclude the work we already started, while during the second year the three organizers would be resident at the ZIF and would be working together for six months. All of the PIs are mathematical physicists, but the idea of ​​the project is to use mathematics only as a common language and to rather devote most of our attention to the role played by networks in other sciences. In comparison to what has already been so successfully done over the last 15 years in the field of complex networks, we would like to use some harder (or, at least, less soft) mathematical tools: essentially, symmetric graph theory, functional analysis and differential or difference equations, to complement statistical methods.
        Much of the group's budget would be devoted to invite colleagues (needless to say: colleagues active in potentially far away areas) with whom we would discuss and (try to) find contact points: we would particularly like to meet economists, ecologists and sociologists. Admittedly, our research plan is very speculative, just like almost every truly interdisciplinary research. Though, it is - I am convinced - potentially very interesting and innovative. It would be very interesting to discuss with you, both because your own research topics are of course tightly related to those of our project in Bielefeld and also because (not less important) your extensive experience with interdisciplinary research can teach us a lot (although the theory of interdisciplinarity itself will not be a research topic for us).
        Specifically, my proposal to you is that (assuming that our research project is approved) you come to Bielefeld and spend with us a few weeks (two to four, say, depending on your personal commitments) at a time suitable to you between October, 2013 and March, 2014. You would be living with us in the campus of the ZIF and discuss with the "fellows" present at the time - likely a half-dozen, working on various aspects of human sciences. I realize this is all terribly premature (this is something that would begin at earliest in one year and a half), but the ZIF is interested in a possible core of "fellows" who accept to participate - even just in principle, at this early stage. The point is that these names may clarify the approach and the disciplinary spectrum of our research project.
        If you are unwilling or unable to accept our invitation, I would be very grateful if you could suggest to me some colleagues of yours who might, in your opinion, be interested in our project.

> > Thank you for your attention. > > Yours sincerely, > Delio Mugnolo >

        Jun.-Prof. PD Dr. Delio Mugnolo
        Institut für Analysis
        Universität Ulm
        D-89081 Ulm
        Germany
        tel: +49-(0)731-5023603  fax: +49-(0)731-5023619
        www.mathematik.uni-ulm.de/analysis/mugnolo>
    -- 

> Peter Bearman > Cole Professor of the Social Sciences > Director: PFL Center for the Social Sciences > Columbia University > CB 3355; 803 IAB, 420 W 118th Street > New York, New York 10027 > v: 212 854-3094; f: 212 854-8925 -- Peter Bearman Cole Professor of the Social Sciences Director: PFL Center for the Social Sciences Columbia University CB 3355; 803 IAB, 420 W 118th Street New York, New York 10027 v: 212 854-3094; f: 212 854-8925

Bearman

Peter Shawn Bearman is the Jonathan Cole Professor of the Social Sciences in the Department of Sociology at Columbia University. Director of the Interdisciplinary Center for Innovative Theories and Empirics (INCITE). He is former Director of the Institute for Social and Economic Research and Policy (ISERP). He received his Ph.D in sociology from Harvard University in 1985.

Peter Bearman
INCITE -- Columbia University
606 W. 122nd Street
New York, New York
Allessandra 212 945 8223 

Complexity journal #8

Awards and Honors

  • Awarded Roger V. Gould Prize for his 2004 article in American Journal of Sociology.

General Editor of the journal Kinship, Networks, and History and is or has been on the editorial board of the American Journal of Sociology, Social Forces, and Sociological Theory.

Dorothy Bearman / Sidney George Rutledge

Publications

Peter Bearman. 1997. Generalized Exchange. American Journal of Sociology. Vol. 102, No. 5 (March 1997), pp. 1383-1415. http://www.academicroom.com/article/generalized-exchange-0 Groote Eylandt: following kinship circuits through the boys (a footnote)

Books

Drawing on a remarkable data set compiled from ships’ logs, journals, factory correspondence, ledgers, and reports that provide unusually precise information on each of the 4,572 voyages taken by English traders of the East India Company (hereafter EIC), we describe the EIC trade network over time, from 1601 to 1833. From structural images of voyages organized by shipping seasons, the authors map (over time and space) the emergence of dense, fully integrated, global trade networks to reveal globalization long before what is now called “globalization.” The authors show that the integration of the world trade system under the aegis of the EIC was the unintended by‐product of systematic individual malfeasance (private trading) on the part of ship captains seeking profit from internal Eastern trade.
  • Erikson, Emily. 2014. Between Monopoly and Free Trade: The English East India Company, 1600-1757. Princeton. Princeton University Press. http://press.princeton.edu/titles/10262.html The English East India Company was one of the most powerful and enduring organizations in history. Between Monopoly and Free Trade locates the source of that success in the innovative policy by which the Company’s Court of Directors granted employees the right to pursue their own commercial interests while in the firm’s employ. Exploring trade network dynamics, decision-making processes, and ports and organizational context, Emily Erikson demonstrates why the English East India Company was a dominant force in the expansion of trade between Europe and Asia, and she sheds light on the related problems of why England experienced rapid economic development and how the relationship between Europe and Asia shifted in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.
  • Doormen. University of Chicago Press, 2005 ISBN
    • Review, "All Visitors Must Be Announced" Judith Martin, New York Times Book Review; Dec 4, 2005;
    • Review, Publishers Weekly. New York: Aug 29, 2005. Vol. 252, Iss. 34; p. 51 (1 page)
    • Review "Modeling Ethnography" by Harvey Molotch. Contemporary Sociology.: May 2006. Vol.35, Iss. 3; pg. 234, 3 pgs
  • Relations into Rhetorics: Local Elite Social Structure in Norfolk, England: 1540-1640 American Sociological Association, Rose Monograph Series. Rutgers University Press, 1993. ISBN

Peer-Reviewed articles

Also: Peter Bearman. 1997. Generalized Exchange. American Journal of Sociology. Vol. 102, No. 5 (March 1997), pp. 1383-1415. http://www.academicroom.com/article/generalized-exchange-0 Id13 Groote Eylandt

The most recent among his approximately 20 peer-reviewed articles are:

Drawing on a remarkable data set compiled from ships’ logs, journals, factory correspondence, ledgers, and reports that provide unusually precise information on each of the 4,572 voyages taken by English traders of the East India Company (hereafter EIC), we describe the EIC trade network over time, from 1601 to 1833. From structural images of voyages organized by shipping seasons, the authors map (over time and space) the emergence of dense, fully integrated, global trade networks to reveal globalization long before what is now called “globalization.” The authors show that the integration of the world trade system under the aegis of the EIC was the unintended by‐product of systematic individual malfeasance (private trading) on the part of ship captains seeking profit from internal Eastern trade.
  • Brückner, Hannah and Peter S. Bearman. “After the Promise: The STD Consequences of Adolescent Virginity Pledges”. Journal of Adolescent Health 36:271-278
  • Bearman, Peter S. and Paolo Parigi. “Cloning Headless Frogs and Other Important Matters: Conversation Topics and Network Structure”. Social Forces. 83 (2): 535-557 (2004)
  • Brückner, Hannah, Anne Martin and Peter S. Bearman. “Ambivalence and Pregnancy: Adolescent Attitudes, Contraception, and Pregnancy”. Perspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health. 36 (6): 248-257 (2004)
  • Bearman, Peter S, James Moody and Katherine Stovel. “Chains of Affection: The Structure of Adolescent Romantic and Sexual Networks”. American Journal of Sociology. Vol. 110.1.44-91 (2004) (Awarded Roger V. Gould Prize; AJS 2004-05
  • Bearman, Peter S. and Brückner, Hannah. "Promising the Future: Virginity Pledges and First Intercourse" American Journal of Sociology, 106, 4, p.859- (2001)

Popular Articles

  • "Hooking Up" Peter Bearman, James Moody, Katherine Stovel. Harper's Magazine. New York: Jun 2005. Vol. 310, Iss. 1861; p. 22-

Major reports from his Longitudinal Studies

  • 2004 Bearman, Peter, Katherine Stovel, James Moody, and Lisa Thalji. "The Structure of Sexual Networks and the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health", in Network Epidemiology: A Handbook For Survey Design and Data Collection. Martina Morris (ed.). Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  • 2003 Brückner, H and Peter S Bearman . Dating Behavior and Sexual Activity Among Young Adolescents, in Albert, William, Sarah Brown and Christine Flanagan (ed) Fourteen and Younger: The Sexual Behavior of Young Adolescents. National Campaign To Prevent Teen Pregnancy. Washington, D.C.
  • 1999 Bearman, Peter S. and Hannah Brückner. Power in Numbers: Peer Effects on Adolescent Girls’ Sexual Debut and Pregnancy. National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy: Research Monographs. Washington, D.C.
  • 1999 Bearman, Peter S, and Hannah Brückner. “Peer Effects on Adolescent Girls’ Sexual Debut and Pregnancy: An Analysis of a National Sample of Adolescent Girls”, in Peer Potential: Making the Most of How Teens Influence Each Other. National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy. Washington, D.C.
  • 1998 Bearman, Peter S. and Hannah Brückner. “Peer Effects on Adolescent Girls’ Sexual Debut and Pregnancy Risk”. PPFY Network, Vol2. No3.
  • 1998 Bearman, Peter S and Laura Burns. “Adolescents, Health and School: Early Findings From the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health.” NASSP Bulletin. Vol. 82:601-23.
  • 1997 Udry, J. Richard and Peter S. Bearman. “New Methods for New Perspectives on Adolescent Sexual Behavior”. In Richard Jessor (ed). New Perspectives on Adolescent Sexual Behavior. Cambridge University Press.
  • 1997 Bearman, PS., J. Jones, and J. R. Udry. “Connections Count: Adolescent Health and the Design of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health.” [1]

References

Other Publication Lists

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