Scott

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These 13 sub-20 minute episodes are the best thing on the Internet: https://www.facebook.com/honytheseries/videos. I have never watched anything like this on film that gives you such a deep sense of the human psyche on such a personal level. If you haven't watched them yet, I highly recommend it. You need to watch them on Facebook.

Account is locked for your protection, need to call them on Monday during business hours to unlock.
On Sat, Feb 3, 2018 at 1:40 PM Doug White <douglas.white@uci.edu> wrote:
   https://login.fidelity.com/ftgw/Fidelity/RtlCust/Login/Init?AuthRedUrl=https://oltx.fidelity.com/ftgw/fbc/ofsummary/defaultPage
   does something like this still work?
   --
   Doug White UCI. --  rebalancing of your portfolio:     https://finance.yahoo.com/news/interest-rate-angst-trips-u-004859871.html
hugs,
Scott
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FYI, I transferred 5K out of your checking and 5K out of my savings to cover third and final payment for Lakeside this year.

for Lilyan I think the tricks outlined there only apply if you were born after 1954 but I could be wrong: https://www.thebalance.com/social-security-rules-for-restricted-applications-2388915.

On Sat, Jan 20, 2018 at 10:34 AM, Doug White <douglas.white@uci.edu> wrote:

   https://purchases.moneymappress.com/NVXCAWDWB39MMP/ENVXU1JN/index.htm?pageNumber=2&email=drwhite%40uci.edu&src=Groupd2&a=8&o=66014&s=96397&u=9256555&l=2198142&r=WEB&vid=cS2eJS&g=0&h=true&link_source=button&vidTime=0&ecn=e625bc6f18226ee40abe05789be47671&iv=d015738fa638248b  Scott: how about if we split a marajuana purchase of $200 or more, whatever you want, put in a jount total that you want, I'll pay my half?

Btw (Scott):, Lilyan should be receiving spousal benefits instead of her own benefits since they are supposed to automatically the one that it is greater: "As a spouse, you can claim a Social Security benefit based on your own earnings record, or you can collect a spousal benefit that will provide you 50 percent of the amount of your spouse’s Social Security benefit as calculated at their full retirement age (Full Retirement Age FRA). Check the Social Security website to determine what your FRA is, as it depends on your year of birth. If you file before you reach your own FRA, your spousal benefit will be reduced because you are filing early.

You are automatically entitled to receive either a benefit based on your own earnings or a spousal benefit based on your spouse's or ex-spouse's earnings. Social Security calculates and pays the higher amount."

https://www.thebalance.com/how-the-the-social-security-spouse-benefit-works-2388924

On Wed, Dec 13, 2017 at 1:21 PM, Douglas White <douglas.white@uci.edu> wrote:

   The Little Black Book of Social Security Secrets, Couples Ages 62-70: Act Now, Retire Secure Later will be auto-delivered wirelessly to LA...'s Kindle Cloud Reader. You can go to your device to start reading. -- Doug



Re: Doug - On Thu, Oct 19, 2017 at 11:25 AM Doug White <douglas.white@uci.edu> wrote: Doug's credit score is very good but there are a few things he needs to cleanup: - He has a $500 delinquent account with Amazon ending in account number 8544. - He has open lines of credit with American Express ($2K credit line), CBNA ($3.3K credit line), Chase Card ($10K credit line), and Use Credit ($15K credit line).

The only material credit balance he has is with Use Credit for an auto loan and that's for $4051K although only Experian is reporting that one so that could be paid off.

Please close each of those 4 credit lines and verify whether he actually has a balance with Use Credit. The account number for that one ends in 4001.

best,

Scott. Scott White

Genes mirror geography in Europe

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2735096/

Seattle

  • Scott 12243 Dayton North Seattle 98133 - Scott-206 384 9439 Katie-206 303 7776 / Catherine Keefe
Catherine Keefe Holloween Birthday 30th Oct
   "downtown uber eats"? No just Uber Eats.
   On 10/18/17 8:04 PM, Scott White wrote:
   > Download Uber Eats on iphone App Store and follow directions.

https://www.eraliving.com/communities/broadview/calendar/ Ida Culver House Broadview 12505 Greenwood Avenue N Seattle, WA 98133

(206) 452-3206 Health Care Center: (206) 204-5294

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10154652553461851&set=a.49129526850.73682.637541850&type=3&theater

....'s credit score is very good but there are a few things he needs to cleanup: - He has a $500 delinquent account with Amazon ending in account number 8544. - He has open lines of credit with American Express ($2K credit line), CBNA ($3.3K credit line), Chase Card ($10K credit line), and Use Credit ($15K credit line).

The only material credit balance he has is with Use Credit for an auto loan and that's for $4051K although only Experian is reporting that one so that could be paid off.

Please close each of those 4 credit lines and verify whether he actually has a balance with Use Credit. The account number for that one ends in 4001.

  • Departure Thu, Aug 3 2017

Alaska Airlines 184 Seattle (SEA) 7:25pm flying to San Diego (SAN) 10:04pm Cabin: Economy / Coach (L) 2h 39m duration Total Duration 2h 39m flight-image Return Sun, Aug 6 Alaska Airlines 481 San Diego (SAN) 9:55am flying to Seattle (SEA) 12:43pm Cabin: Economy / Coach (Q) 2h 48m duration

1) call bank of america to help you set up 2 factor authentication
2) Setup evernote for private note taking: evernote.com
3) stop using wiki for private notetaking and use evernote instead
4) Evernote to SCOTT
5) keep private diary of all interactions with non-trusted sources: who, what, where when
6) Just go to this link: https://www.evernote.com/Login.action and enter 'drwhite@uci.edu' in the input box and then click Forgot Password link under the box and it will send you a link so you can reset your password.

Scams

  • I got called twice today by people claiming to be from Microsoft Support and wanting to install software on my computer. As this article states, Microsoft would never do that and it's a total scam.
  • I got a call from someone with an Indian accent claiming to be from Microsoft support and he wanted to install some software on my machine. It was a scam! If you ever get a call like that please hang up. - for Lilyan

Chris White

Scott, I booked a flight from Friday Morning, arrive 11:50 to Sunday. 5:50 flight. I have a room at the Hyatt near your folks. Pools, sushi restaurant there...Maybe I can take the kids Saturday for part of the day and you can have some time with your folks...Or what ever is best. I'm looking forward to hanging out with you and the Whites.

Spencer will want to do LeggoLand or maybe Sea world? I don't know what might be iconic for him at his age. Will talk more soon.

Chris White

First 7 jobs

1. Newspaper delivery boy
2. Babysitter
3. Consulting IT guy
4. Intern at French hardware manufacturer
5. Digital radio station installer/technician
6. Military simulation developer
7. Engineer at financial startup
(many more)

AirBnB worldwide

Paris Montorgueil 1122$/week

AirBnB near Scott

Rented Home

Sent you in Facebook messenger but copying here: “The figure below is one of the most amazing demonstrations of the power of mathematics I've ever seen.

Here's how it was made (explanation requires university-level linear algebra to fully understand). About 1000 people of European ancestry had blood samples taken, and sequenced for about 200,000 genetic markers. This produces a matrix of size 1000 x 200,000.

From this matrix, produce a covariance matrix: multiply the matrix times its transpose to get a 1000 x 1000 matrix. Now plot a histogram of the eigenvalues. If the original big matrix of data were totally random, this histogram would follow a precise law known as the Marchenko-Pastur distribution: one of the cornerstones of random matrix theory.

What you actually see is practically all of the eigenvalues follow the random matrix distribution perfectly, except for two very prominent outliers. Each of these two outlier eigenvalues has an associated eigenvector of dimension 1000 (one entry for each subject in the study); so putting these two eigenvectors together gives a coordinate in 2-dimensional space for each subject.

Below is the plot of those 1000 points in the plane. They are also colored according to the country of origin of the subject's grandparents (which the researchers also noted when collecting the data, but did not use in the analysis until after the plot was made).

As you can see: purely genetic information amazingly accurately encodes the geographic information of the subjects' ancestors. THERE'S A MAP OF EUROPE HIDDEN IN THEIR GENES. And it's amazingly detailed: if you look closely, the genes even encode, geographically precisely, whether Swiss subjects' ancestors came from French speaking, German speaking, or Italian speaking regions of Switzerland.

This was published in Nature in 2008.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2735096/

I only learned about this last week, in a phenomenal talk by Stanford statistician and former MacArthur Fellow David Donoho. His talk launched from here, using even more sophisticated random matrix theory to explain finer details of the map (it's not perfect: Italy and Spain are too wide, and we now understand exactly why, thanks to the analysis of spiked covariance random matrix models recently completed by some of my colleagues).

It is amazing that this information is encoded in our genes. What's even more amazing is that finding this signal there in the data is the result of some very sophisticated mathematics, in the field I work in: a field which was born out of a failed attempt to explain the strong nuclear force in physics, and has been developed largely in a purely theoretical world for decades. Now, it is at the heart of signal processing, wireless communications, and (apparently) population genetics.

If you ever need a reason why we (mathematicians) do what we do, this is it. Not that we're looking for these connections in our work every day. But the fact that sophisticated mathematics leads to such amazing real-world discoveries vindicates every overly-abstract paper we write.”


demonstrations of the power of mathematics

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2735096/

Sent you in Facebook messenger but copying here: “The figure below is one of the most amazing demonstrations of the power of mathematics I've ever seen.

Here's how it was made (explanation requires university-level linear algebra to fully understand). About 1000 people of European ancestry had blood samples taken, and sequenced for about 200,000 genetic markers. This produces a matrix of size 1000 x 200,000.

From this matrix, produce a covariance matrix: multiply the matrix times its transpose to get a 1000 x 1000 matrix. Now plot a histogram of the eigenvalues. If the original big matrix of data were totally random, this histogram would follow a precise law known as the Marchenko-Pastur distribution: one of the cornerstones of random matrix theory.

What you actually see is practically all of the eigenvalues follow the random matrix distribution perfectly, except for two very prominent outliers. Each of these two outlier eigenvalues has an associated eigenvector of dimension 1000 (one entry for each subject in the study); so putting these two eigenvectors together gives a coordinate in 2-dimensional space for each subject.

Below is the plot of those 1000 points in the plane. They are also colored according to the country of origin of the subject's grandparents (which the researchers also noted when collecting the data, but did not use in the analysis until after the plot was made).

As you can see: purely genetic information amazingly accurately encodes the geographic information of the subjects' ancestors. THERE'S A MAP OF EUROPE HIDDEN IN THEIR GENES. And it's amazingly detailed: if you look closely, the genes even encode, geographically precisely, whether Swiss subjects' ancestors came from French speaking, German speaking, or Italian speaking regions of Switzerland.

This was published in Nature in 2008.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2735096/

I only learned about this last week, in a phenomenal talk by Stanford statistician and former MacArthur Fellow David Donoho. His talk launched from here, using even more sophisticated random matrix theory to explain finer details of the map (it's not perfect: Italy and Spain are too wide, and we now understand exactly why, thanks to the analysis of spiked covariance random matrix models recently completed by some of my colleagues).

It is amazing that this information is encoded in our genes. What's even more amazing is that finding this signal there in the data is the result of some very sophisticated mathematics, in the field I work in: a field which was born out of a failed attempt to explain the strong nuclear force in physics, and has been developed largely in a purely theoretical world for decades. Now, it is at the heart of signal processing, wireless communications, and (apparently) population genetics.

If you ever need a reason why we (mathematicians) do what we do, this is it. Not that we're looking for these connections in our work every day. But the fact that sophisticated mathematics leads to such amazing real-world discoveries vindicates every overly-abstract paper we write.”

Sent you in Facebook messenger but copying here: “The figure below is one of the most amazing demonstrations of the power of mathematics I've ever seen.

Here's how it was made (explanation requires university-level linear algebra to fully understand). About 1000 people of European ancestry had blood samples taken, and sequenced for about 200,000 genetic markers. This produces a matrix of size 1000 x 200,000.

From this matrix, produce a covariance matrix: multiply the matrix times its transpose to get a 1000 x 1000 matrix. Now plot a histogram of the eigenvalues. If the original big matrix of data were totally random, this histogram would follow a precise law known as the Marchenko-Pastur distribution: one of the cornerstones of random matrix theory.

What you actually see is practically all of the eigenvalues follow the random matrix distribution perfectly, except for two very prominent outliers. Each of these two outlier eigenvalues has an associated eigenvector of dimension 1000 (one entry for each subject in the study); so putting these two eigenvectors together gives a coordinate in 2-dimensional space for each subject.

Below is the plot of those 1000 points in the plane. They are also colored according to the country of origin of the subject's grandparents (which the researchers also noted when collecting the data, but did not use in the analysis until after the plot was made).

As you can see: purely genetic information amazingly accurately encodes the geographic information of the subjects' ancestors. THERE'S A MAP OF EUROPE HIDDEN IN THEIR GENES. And it's amazingly detailed: if you look closely, the genes even encode, geographically precisely, whether Swiss subjects' ancestors came from French speaking, German speaking, or Italian speaking regions of Switzerland.

This was published in Nature in 2008.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2735096/

I only learned about this last week, in a phenomenal talk by Stanford statistician and former MacArthur Fellow David Donoho. His talk launched from here, using even more sophisticated random matrix theory to explain finer details of the map (it's not perfect: Italy and Spain are too wide, and we now understand exactly why, thanks to the analysis of spiked covariance random matrix models recently completed by some of my colleagues).

It is amazing that this information is encoded in our genes. What's even more amazing is that finding this signal there in the data is the result of some very sophisticated mathematics, in the field I work in: a field which was born out of a failed attempt to explain the strong nuclear force in physics, and has been developed largely in a purely theoretical world for decades. Now, it is at the heart of signal processing, wireless communications, and (apparently) population genetics.

If you ever need a reason why we (mathematicians) do what we do, this is it. Not that we're looking for these connections in our work every day. But the fact that sophisticated mathematics leads to such amazing real-world discoveries vindicates every overly-abstract paper we write.”

Goodreads

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9477538 10/19 Scott White rated a book 5 of 5 stars Here On Earth: An Argument For Hope by Tim Flannery


add a comment 6882 10/19 Scott White rated a book 5 of 5 stars Papillon by Henri Charrière


add a comment 3640 10/19 Scott White rated a book 5 of 5 stars Indian Givers: How the Indians of the Americas Transformed the World by Jack Weatherford


add a comment 11 10/19 Scott White rated a book 5 of 5 stars The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy (Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, #1) by Douglas Adams


add a comment 8263139 10/19 Scott White rated a book 4 of 5 stars The Moneyless Man: A Year Of Freeconomic Living by Mark Boyle

add a comment 9519944 10/19 Scott White rated a book 4 of 5 stars Early Retirement Extreme: A Philosophical and Practical Guide to Financial Independence by Jacob Lund Fisker


add a comment 611919 10/19 Scott White rated a book 4 of 5 stars The Backpacker's Handbook by Chris Townsend


add a comment 60929 10/19 Scott White rated a book 4 of 5 stars Dawn (Xenogenesis, #1) by Octavia E. Butler

add a comment 13530973 10/19 Scott White rated a book 4 of 5 stars Antifragile: Things That Gain from Disorder by Nassim Nicholas Taleb


add a comment 506636 10/19 Scott White rated a book 4 of 5 stars Clan Apis by Jay Hosler


add a comment 33313 10/19 Scott White rated a book 4 of 5 stars Kitchen Confidential: Adventures in the Culinary Underbelly by Anthony Bourdain


add a comment 25460 10/19 Scott White rated a book 4 of 5 stars Animal, Vegetable, Miracle: A Year of Food Life by Barbara Kingsolverv


add a comment 9206187 10/19 Scott White rated a book 3 of 5 stars Everything is Obvious: Once You Know the Answer by Duncan J. Watts


add a comment 7445 10/19 Scott White rated a book 3 of 5 stars The Glass Castle by Jeannette Walls


add a comment 1645326 10/19 Scott White rated a book 3 of 5 stars The Northern Crusades by Eric Christiansen


add a comment 17933064 10/19 Scott White rated a book 3 of 5 stars Invent To Learn: Making, Tinkering, and Engineering in the Classroom by Sylvia Libow Martinez


add a comment 1590057 10/19 Scott White wants to read The Unnatural History of the Sea by Callum Roberts bookshelves: to-read


add a comment 6667514 10/19 Scott White wants to read The Checklist Manifesto: How to Get Things Right by Atul Gawande bookshelves: to-read