Stephen M. Lyon

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2015-2016 Lyon

Lyon, Stephen M; & Mughal, Muhammad Aurang Zeb. (2016). Ties That Bind:Marital Networks and Politics in Punjab, Pakistan. Structure and Dynamics: eJournal of Anthropological and Related Sciences, 9(2). imbs_socdyn_sdeas_32330. Retrieved from: http://escholarship.org/uc/item/5378v2fx

Lyon, Dr. Stephen M.; Jamieson, Mark A.; & Fischer, Michael D.(2015). Persistent Cultures: Miskitu Kinship Terminological Fluidity. Structure and Dynamics: eJournal of Anthropological and Related Sciences, 8(1). imbs_socdyn_sdeas_27342. Retrieved from: http://escholarship.org/uc/item/6w65n7sf

Powells, Gareth, Sandra Bell, Ellis P. Judson, Stephen M. Lyon, Robin Wardle, Klara Anna Capova, and Harriet Bulkeley. 2015. “Fostering Active Network Management through SMEs’ Practises.” Energy Efficiency. 1–14. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12053-015-9382-y

Nov 30 2016  S.M.Lyon@durham.ac.uk
 Hi,

I’ve had one acceptance to review this one (McPherson in S&D), and he accepted the default timeline of 3 weeks with no problem. One person declined and I’m waiting to hear back from 3 others. If Mike has some ideas for good reviewers, that would be great. I used the bibliography of McPherson’s paper itself to identify people who are engaged in similar debates, so that may not give us the right kind of critical perspective. We can see what the reviews say— if it looks too sycophantic then we know I picked the wrong people (or that the paper really is great).

Best, Steve
Nov 27 2016
On 11/24/16 5:26 AM, LYON, STEPHEN M. wrote:
Hi,

I’ve had a chance to go through the manuscripts now and have sent the MacPherson article (on cuteness) to three potential reviewers. I’ve left the Dissanayake one (on emotions) for Michael to take a decision as to whether it should go for peer review. My reading of it isn’t so optimistic. It looks a bit thin and like it’s not yet at a stage where it would be ready for substantial peer review, but perhaps it’s just too far outside my area.


 Nov 13 2016 Hi Doug,
 Thanks. I’m sorry that you’re not able to do so much right now, but don’t worry— we’ll get it sorted.
 I’ll be in Minneapolis on Wednesday and will meet with Michael and we’ll get on top of this, but in the meantime I’ll start the
 reviews process for the two other manuscripts.
 Best, Steve
   https://www.dur.ac.uk/research/directory/staff/?id=742
   Justin Gonder
  • Hi -- Thanks very much. I'd be honoured to be a co-editor of WC.
    • I'd be grateful for World Cultures to consider publishing this manuscript. It is explicitly comparative across cultures. It examines role expectations and practices between cross sex siblings in Japan and South Asia. The rationale for such an imbalanced comparison (a sub continent and a single country) lay in the foundational texts that I use to make the historical case about role expectations. In the case of South Asia, the Vedic texts are relevant across most of South Asia. In Japan the Kojikii and Nihonshogi are relevant only for Japan.
  • Michael-- the piece that Doug is referring to is different from the special issue that Giovanni is guest editing. I'll be submitting an additional article for that is co-authored by Zeb Mughal.
  • Best Steve Lyon

Web: http://community.dur.ac.uk/s.m.lyon/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/stelynews

Lyon, Stephen M; & Mughal, Muhammad Aurang Zeb. (2016). Ties That Bind:Marital Networks and Politics in Punjab, Pakistan. Structure and Dynamics: eJournal of Anthropological and Related Sciences, 9(2). imbs_socdyn_sdeas_32330. Retrieved from: http://escholarship.org/uc/item/5378v2fx

Lyon, Stephen M.; Jamieson, Mark A.; & Fischer, Michael D.(2015). Persistent Cultures: Miskitu Kinship Terminological Fluidity. Structure and Dynamics: eJournal of Anthropological and Related Sciences, 8(1). imbs_socdyn_sdeas_27342. Retrieved from: http://escholarship.org/uc/item/6w65n7sf

Powells, G., Bell, S., Judson, E. P., Lyon, S. M., Wardle, R., Capova, K. A., & Bulkeley, H. (2016). Fostering active network management through SMEs’ practises. Energy Efficiency, 9(3), 591–604. http://doi.org/10.1007/s12053-015-9382-y

Dr. Stephen M. Lyon

   Stephen M. Lyon Senior Lecturer in the Department of Anthropology
   Conflict resolution, political and legal anthropology
   E-Social Science
   Islam
   Pakistan
Telephone: 0191 334 1597
Fax: 0191 334 1615
Theses at Durham: http://dro.dur.ac.uk/
Web: http://www.dur.ac.uk/s.m.lyon/  S.M.Lyon@durham.ac.uk   
https://www.dur.ac.uk/anthropology/staff/academic/?id=742

Lyon, Dr. Stephen M., Durham University; Jamieson, Mark A., University of East London; Fischer, Michael D., University of Kent. 2015.Persistent Cultures: Miskitu Kinship Terminological Fluidity. Structure and Dynamics, 8(1)

Re:Article: Miskito Now: page size is standard American. Spelling is British, as before. Delete phrases/words with === overlay Then my changes or additions are bolded. Make your final edits then send it back, either of us (or any of your authors) can send it back. I can put what you decide is final at the S&D site. Looks great!

Throughout all of my research, I have attempted to be an ‘early adopter’ of information and communication technologies. This has included innovative use of the internet, the www, digital video and audio, simulation and social network analysis software-- lists like this get tedious and pointless beyond a certain number. Suffice to say, I am not a computer master, by any means, but I recognise a good tool when I see one.

Theoretically, one thing that links all of these different activities is an interest in cultural systems, be they in the domains of politics, marriage, economics, health or religion. To this end, I have a strong interest in formal modelling which has led to my involvement in projects developing e-science software tools for social scientists.

History and Anthropology: http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/ghan

Honorary Editor of the Anthropological Index Online: http://aio.anthropology.org.uk/

Main research themes I argue throughout the body of my research that, operationally, the only defensible concept of culture is one of competing specialised cultural systems. Such systems are not all equally powerful, nor are they all equally pervasive; an important thread throughout my work is a focus on those cultural systems which would seem to be core to the culture in question. So for example, from the ethnographic body of evidence available, it would appear that the symbolic systems which generate genealogical relationships between people (i.e. kinship terminologies), is a core cultural system in most, if not all extant cultures. Indeed, it may be that some rudimentary form of kinship terminology exists among the great apes suggesting that something we might call proto-cultural systems must have been present in our common ancestors. Other core cultural systems for specific cultures (such as that found in and around both halves of Punjab in South Asia) almost certainly must include basic floral and faunal taxonomic hierarchies, colour classifications, basic principles of honour/self control and of social organisation such as the logic factions. Other cultural systems then build upon core cultural systems and in real life, people must respond to shifting contingencies in ways which best maximise their attainment of their own goals (within the context). Hence, we have unpredictability because there is not a single cultural system guiding attitudes and behaviours, but rather sets of discreet cultural systems which have informed non-core cultural systems (such as legal or religious systems).

Academic Software Working with the Centre for Social Anthropology and Computing at the University of Kent, I have been involved in trialling purpose built software to deal with the complex data types we typically produce in anthropology. The software tools I have been most involved in testing are the CSAC XML Fieldnote Editor, VideoGROK, the CSAC XML Kinship Editor and KAES (the Kinship Algebra Expert System). For more information on these and other potentially useful software tools for working with disparate data types please visit AnthroMethods.net

Fischer, M. D., Lyon, S. M., Sosna, D., & Henig, D. (2013). Harmonizing Diversity: Tuning Anthropological Research to Complexity1 . Social Science Computer Review , 31 (1 ), 3–15. doi:10.1177/0894439312455311 URL: Abstract:

The contributions in this issue of Social Science Computer Review represent a range of computational approaches to theoretical and disciplinary specializations in anthropology that reflect on and expand the future orientation and practice of the formal and comparative agenda in the context of an increasing emphasis on complexity in anthropology as a discipline. Themes covered in this issue include kinship, funerary burials, urban legends, eye tracking, and looking at mode influences on online data collection. A common theme throughout the articles is examining the relationship between global emergent processes and structures and the local individual contributions to this emergence, and how the local and global contexts influence each other. We argue that unless complexity is addressed more overtly by leveraging computational approaches to data collection, analysis and theory building, anthropology and social science more generally face an existential challenge if they are to continue to pursue extended field research exercise, intersubjective productions, deep personal involvement, interaction with materiality, and engagement with people while generating research outcomes of relevance to the world beyond the narrow confines of specialist journals and conferences.

anthropological methods complex systems cognitive science comparison cultural change

David Zeitlyn, SM Lyon. 2012. Varieties of openness and types of digital anthropology. Durham anthropology journal., 2012

Lyon, S. M. (2013). Networks and Kinship: Formal Models of Alliance, Descent, and Inheritance in a Pakistani Punjabi Village . Social Science Computer Review , 31 (1 ), 45–55. doi:10.1177/0894439312453275 URL: http://ssc.sagepub.com/content/31/1/45.abstract Abstract:

Pakistani Punjabi landlords use marriage both strategically as well as affectively. That is to say, they seek maximal political advantage and minimal household disruption with marriage arrangements. Using a set of formal networks analyses tools, this article examines two hundred years of marriage decisions for one Punjabi landlord family. The radical shift in marriage decisions beginning from the 1920s is the result of an earlier shift in inheritance rules. The resulting change in marriage decisions has impacted not only on household dynamics, but has disrupted longstanding factional associations within the village.

Fischer, M. D., Lyon, S. M., Sosna, D., & Henig, D. (2013). Harmonizing Diversity: Tuning Anthropological Research to Complexity1 . Social Science Computer Review , 31 (1 ), 3–15. doi:10.1177/0894439312455311 URL: http://ssc.sagepub.com/content/31/1/3.abstract Abstract:

Abstract: The contributions in this issue of Social Science Computer Review represent a range of computational approaches to theoretical and disciplinary specializations in anthropology that reflect on and expand the future orientation and practice of the formal and comparative agenda in the context of an increasing emphasis on complexity in anthropology as a discipline. Themes covered in this issue include kinship, funerary burials, urban legends, eye tracking, and looking at mode influences on online data collection. A common theme throughout the articles is examining the relationship between global emergent processes and structures and the local individual contributions to this emergence, and how the local and global contexts influence each other. We argue that unless complexity is addressed more overtly by leveraging computational approaches to data collection, analysis and theory building, anthropology and social science more generally face an existential challenge if they are to continue to pursue extended field research exercise, intersubjective productions, deep personal involvement, interaction with materiality, and engagement with people while generating research outcomes of relevance to the world beyond the narrow confines of specialist journals and conferences.

dept home - personal page Senior Lecturer in the [ http://www.dur.ac.uk/anthropology/staff/profile/?id=742 Department of Anthropology, Durham University], Durham England.

PanelC.jpg

Anthropology in Development

Public Culture in Theory & Practice

Editorial Board, Structure and Dynamics: Anthropological and Related Sciences

Jan de Ruiter, Gavin Weston, Stephen M. Lyon. 2011. Dunbar's Number: Group Size and Brain Physiology in Humans Reexamined. American Anthropologist. 113/4: 557-568. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1548-1433.2011.01369.x/abstract

ABSTRACT: Popular academic ideas linking physiological adaptations to social behaviors are spreading disconcertingly into wider societal contexts. In this article, we note our skepticism with one particularly popular—in our view, problematic—supposed causal correlation between neocortex size and social group size. The resulting Dunbar's Number, as it has come to be called, has been statistically tested against observed group size in different primate species. Although there may be reason to doubt the Dunbar's Number hypothesis among nonhuman primate species, we restrict ourselves here to the application of such an explanatory hypothesis to human, culture-manipulating populations. Human information process management, we argue, cannot be understood as a simple product of brain physiology. Cross-cultural comparison of not only group size but also relationship-reckoning systems like kinship terminologies suggests that although neocortices are undoubtedly crucial to human behavior, they cannot be given such primacy in explaining complex group composition, formation, or management.