Steve Doubleday

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Contacts

  • email: stevedoubleday@gmail.com
  • googletalk: sjdayday
  • yahoo IM: sjdayday

Current projects

  1. distributed simulations
  2. computer system simulation
  3. SDSC Summer 2012 Workshop Doubleday notes
Comments on computer system simulation by Doug White

Short bio

Steve Doubleday is a part-time graduate student at UC Irvine's Institute of Mathematical Behavioral Sciences (IMBS). His background is in the practical aspects of computing, based on a 25 year career in commercial computing, most of it spent with Kaiser Permanente. His current interests are in helping make simulations more available for replication, and in the problems of distributing simulations for execution across a network. That takes the concrete form of a preliminary web site: simulationsupport.org.

See

Epistemic games

My search for origins of epistemic game theory Doug 07:41, 16 June 2012 (PDT)

It goes back to Morgenstern 1934 and is still very much in play. Brandenberger brings out the conundrums. Gintis doesnt know or cite this literature and doesnt cite Morgenstern or Brandenberger and the EGT conundrums. The conundrums may well express the root of your Thesis problem with how people fail to coordinate. I rather doubt that the "solution" is to be found in Gintis.

Collins takes another approach that is not Game Theoretic. It is epistemic in terms of building shared frameworks for understanding a problem. I believe that your "solution" may lie there. That is the path that our project is taking. I dont buy the thesis that Gintis is unifying the behavioral sciences.