University of California Multi-Campus Complexity Events 2009-2010

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webcast test Co-Directors: Douglas R. White and Laurent Tambayong
http://bit.ly/8YH2qM - CLICK HERE for past 2008-2009 events.
Our dates are chosen so as not to conflict with the UCLA Marschak colloquium 2009 Calendar 2010 calendar (two saturday 3.5 hour conferences with lunch provided to be scheduled)

COURSE CREDITS- Grad and Undergrad

  1. UCI fall:SOC SCI 240A (fall 72100) grad and undergrad 1.33 credits per quarter. Instructor Douglas R. White, drwhite@uci.edu
  2. UCLA fall: Anthro M193/Hum CS M193P (both undergrad) and Anthro 294 (grad). Journal Club, Human Complex Systems Seminar. 1 unit. Instructor: Dwight Read, dread@anthro.ucla.edu and Course Coordinator: John Bragin, jbragin@ucla.edu
  3. UCSD fall:ANTH 203 "Four-Campus Video conference" seminar (undergrads may also take for credit) Instructor: Geoff Braswell anthro, gbraswel@weber.ucsd.edu

MEETING TIMES FALL: 12:30-1:45

PLEASE NOTE: For fall quarter, all meeting times are 12:30-1:45.

  • For winter and spring we will try to return to the usual times, 1:30-3:00

MEETING PLACES

  1. UCI fall: AIRB 3030 UCI, WINTER AIRB 1030, Spring AIRB 3030 UCI (Anteater I&R Bld) Soc Sci 240A-B-C fall-winter-spring D.R. White
  2. UCLA f-w-s 285 Powell Library
  3. UCSD f-w-s UCSD 260 Galbraith Hall Anth 203 (G. Algaze) "Four Campus Video Conference" in Human Social Complexity

Nonconflicting dates for Marschak talk October 9, October 23, November 6, November 20, December 4


Fall Quarter 2009

Fall focus on games and networks, networks and conflict, network dynamics, business networks

Prominent paper on games and networks, subject of our fall colloquia: please add to the list

Ballester, Coralio & Calvó-Armengol, Antoni & Zenou, Yves, 2005. "Who’s Who in Networks. Wanted: The Key Player" Econometrika 74(5):1403-1417.
Ranjay Gulati Chua Tiampo Professor of Business Administration, Harvard Business School - books and papers.

HSC Videoconference Friday Sept 25 2009 Michael König

Michael König - Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich

12:30-1:45 Friday Sept 25 2009
Games of Dynamic Network Formation Presentation - webcast
  1. UCI fall: 3030 Anteater I&R Bldg (AIRB) Soc Sci 240A (72100) Social Networks and Human Social Complexity (D. White)
  2. UCLA f-w-s 285 Powell Library Anthro M193/Hum CS M193P (ugrad) and Anthro 294 (grad). (D. Read) Human Social Complexity
  3. UCSD f-w-s 260 Galbraith Hall Anth 203 (G. Algaze) "Four Campus Video Conference" in Human Social Complexity

König is an ETH postdoc visiting US Universities and visiting UCSD Sept 20/21-26th.

Abstract: We combine a network game introduced in Ballester et al. (2006), where the Nash equilibrium action of each agent is proportional to her Bonacich centrality, with an endogenous network formation process. Links are formed on the basis of centrality while the network is exposed to a volatile environment introducing interruptions in the connections between agents. Taking into account bounded rational decision making, new links are formed to the neighbors' neighbors with the highest centrality. The volatile environment causes existing links to decay to the neighbor with the lowest centrality. We show analytically that there exist stationary networks and that their topological properties completely match features exhibited by social and economic networks. Moreover, we find that there exists a sharp transition in efficiency and network density from highly centralized to decentralized networks.

emailings: Economics, business/management, networks and MBS program (UCI), political science and anthropology (UCSD)

topics: complexity, tipping points, dynamics of network centrality, simulation and fit to stylized aspects of empirical dynamics of R&D organizations

Reference: Coralio Ballester & Antoni Calvó-Armengol & Yves Zenou, 2006. Who's Who in Networks. Wanted: The Key Player, Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 74(5): 1403-1417.

UCI host: Laurent Tambayong, IMBS PhD. UCSD host: Doug White UCLA host: Dwight Read

HSC Videoconference Friday October 2 2009 Matthew O. Jackson (CANCELED)

Matthew O. Jackson, Economics, Stanford. Title: TBA.
Abstract: TBA.

HSC Videoconference Friday October 16 2009 Michael T. McBride

Michael T. McBride, Associate Professor Economics, UCI.

12:30-2:00 (UCI host Matthew Feldman)

Title: Game Theory and Network Formation with Local Information presentation - webcast

  1. UCI fall: 3030 Anteater I&R Bldg (AIRB) Soc Sci 240A (72100) Social Networks and Human Social Complexity (D. White)
  2. UCLA f-w-s 285 Powell Library Anthro M193/Hum CS M193P (ugrad) and Anthro 294 (grad). (D. Read) Human Social Complexity
  3. UCSD f-w-s 260 Galbraith Hall Anth 203 (G. Algaze) "Four Campus Video Conference" in Human Social Complexity

Abstract: An individual in a social network generally has only very local information about the structure of her network. I will address the issues involved in trying to accommodate local information into a game theoretic approach to network formation. I will discuss how standard solution concepts approach the issue, offer a new way of formally modeling local information in networks, and provide some theoretical results for simple connection models.

UCI host: Matthew Feldman, IMBS 2nd year grad student. UCSD host: Doug White UCLA host: Dwight Read

UCI Open Access program Wednesday, October 21 2009 Douglas R. White

(PodCasted audio and powerpoints) Open Access Day - Open Access Week - Events celebrating Open Access Week

http://replay.oit.uci.edu/public/fall2009/SCAMP_10_21_2009_-_Web_%281024x768%29_-_20091021_05.12.40PM.swf

UCI celebrates Open Access Week 2009, being held around the globe, with five 8-9 minute speakers addressing the themes of the OA movement encouraging free and timely access to research.

UCI's Libraries program, moderated by Lorelei Tanji, is Open Access at UCI: Status & Success With Different Disciplines, co-sponsored by the Associated Graduate Students and the Graduate Resource Center, organized in part by Julia M. Gelfand. (See: Communication and Management Program.

The program is from 3:30-5:00 at the Langson Library #570, beginning with a short and light reception. The program convenes at 3:50 and is followed by time for questions.

4:00 Mathematics: "Why Math Adopted OA from the Onset" Chuu-Lian Terng, Professor and Chairperson of Mathematics,

4:10 Chemistry: "Why Not More Chemistry via OA?" Scott Rychnovsky, Professor of Chemistry & Associate Editor, Journal of Organic Chemistry

4:20 Medicine: "Never Too Many: Multiple OA Journals in Emergency Medicine" Dr. Mark Langdorf, Chair & Medical Director of Emergency Medicine, & Editor, Western Journal of Emergency Medicine,

4:30 Social Sciences/Anthropology: "Maturation of Open Access Journals in Anthropology and experience with the OA InterSciWiki and EduMod Wiki-based OA Educational Program" Douglas White, Professor of Anthropology. Bookmark links:

1 WORLD CULTUREs eJ (IMBS Social Dynamics and Complexity Faculty, editor Pat Gray) NOW SPONSORED BY IMBS
http://repositories.cdlib.org/wc/worldcultures/vol16/iss1/ WORLD CULTURES in eScholarship
http://escholarship.org/uc/search?smode=browse;browse-journal=aa OUR SECOND JOURNAL in eScholarship thru IMBS
Two of the four UC Irvine
2 STRUCTURE AND DYNAMICS eJ (IMBS Social Dynamics and Complexity Faculty, editor Doug White) OUR IMBS FACULTY SUBGROUP AS EDITORS
http://intersci.ss.uci.edu/wiki/index.php/Structure_and_Dynamics_contents#Volume_1_2005-2006 OUR SECOND JOURNAL Str&Dyn CONTENTS
http://www.doaj.org/doaj?func=openurl&issn=15543374&genre=journal DOAJ INDEX of our 2nd eJournal
http://repositories.cdlib.org/imbs/socdyn/sdeas/vol3/iss3/art1/ direct link to current issue
  • TWO WIKI sites FOR TELECONFERENCES AND INSTRUCTION
3 The InterSciWiki (IMBS Social Dynamics and Complexity Faculty, editor Doug White)
http://intersci.ss.uci.edu/wiki home page for this OA wiki site
4 The EduMod Wiki-based Educational Program (IMBS Social Dynamics and Complexity Faculty, editor Doug White)
http://intersci.ss.uci.edu/wiki/index.php/EduMod A NEW INSTRUCTIIONAL SYSTEM on the OA wiki

4:40 Humanities: "Open Humanities Press: A Collective in the Humanities" Wikipedia:Open Humanities Press Barbara Cohen, Former Director, UCI HumaniTech and Editorial Board Member of Open Humanities Press.

4:50 Questions and discussion

HSC Videoconference Friday October 30 2009 Zeev Maoz

Zeevmaoz3.jpg

12:40-2:10 Zeev Maoz, Political Science, UC Davis. (Zeev Maoz) - webcast

How Cooperation Emerges from Conflict: An Agent-Based Model of Security Network Formation - powerpoint - with Open office

  1. 3030 Anteater I&R Bldg (AIRB) UCI fall: Soc Sci 240A (72100) Social Networks and Human Social Complexity (D. White)
  2. 285 Powell Library UCLA f-w-s Anthro M193/Hum CS M193P (ugrad) and Anthro 294 (grad). (D. Read) Human Social Complexity
  3. 260 Galbraith Hall UCSD f-w-s Anth 203 (G. Algaze) "Four Campus Video Conference" in Human Social Complexity
  4. 250 Olson Hall UC DAVIS UC Davis classroom technology Services Bill Sykes Academic Technology (530) 752-2133 ats@ucdavis.edu

Abstract. This paper develops and tests a theory on how international security networks form and how they evolve. The theory integrates ideas from the realist, liberal, and constructivist/cultural paradigms. The basic idea of the theory is that states are driven to security cooperation by the wish to balance the capabilities of their Strategic Reference Group (SRG). A SRG is a set of states that are perceived to pose a security challenge to the focal state. The propositions of the theory cover the process by which states seek allies, the choice of allies, and the emergent structure of security networks that result from these choices. The process envisioned by the theory forms the basis for an agent-based model of security networks. This model allows a general exploration of the network implications of alliance formation and alliance change processes. The agent-based model is tested on simulated data, as well as on real world data covering the 1816-2001 period. The implications of the agent-based model and the empirical findings are discussed.

HSC Videoconference Friday November 13 2009 Phil Bonacich

12:40-2:20 Phillip Bonacich, Sociology Dept., UCLA

Power and Exploitation in Exchange Networks: A Social-Psychological Model powerpoint - pdf - webcast


Abstract: Social exchanges are governed both by the pro-social norm of reciprocity, which asks that one discharge obligations to others by reciprocating their gifts and favors, and by opportunistic exploitation of others who are in weak and dependent positions. Which of these antagonistic motivations predominates has far-reaching implications for inequality and the distribution of power within exchange networks.

scientific commons references <-- has malware

Winter Quarter 2010

HSC Videoconference Friday January 15 2010 Doug White

1:30-3:15 Douglas R. White, IMBS, UCI Inferential statistics for networks of causality: Designing an eRepository for Anthropological Sciences pdf of ppt - student ppt on predictors of rape - student ppt on predictors of warfare and fighting - Edu-Mod 2009: The Individual Studies - Short 2SLS primer on Pearl Causal Graphs - webcast - Sample study: Causes_of_Polygyny_and_Instrumental_Variables

  1. UCI 3030 Anteater I&R Bldg (AIRB) Credit: Soc Sci 240B (72100) Social Networks and Human Social Complexity (D. White)
  2. UCLA 285 Powell Library Credit: Anthro M193/Hum CS M193P (ugrad) and Anthro 294 (grad). (D. Read) Human Social Complexity
  3. UCSD 260 Galbraith Hall Credit: Anth 203 (G. Algaze) "Four Campus Video Conference" in Human Social Complexity
  4. UC DAVIS 250 Olson Hall UC Davis classroom technology Services Bill Sykes Academic Technology (530) 752-2133 ats@ucdavis.edu

Open access to data, software for inferential statistics, and findings of these new methods expand the benefits of broad interdisciplinary collaborations analyzing and expanding on world ethnographic data coded for the Standard Cross-Cultural Sample (1969) and other databases.

This talk explains how these benefits can contribute to a proposed Open eRepository for Anthropological Knowledge that can serve researchers and classes worldwide

  1. Solving Galton’s problem of nonindependence using Instrumental Variables for language and spatial clustering (Eff and Dow 2009 2-stage least squares) to significantly improve the quality of regression analyses that set the stage for Bayesian causal analyses.
  2. Detecting causality from observation and categorical data (computer science and econometric use of Bayesian constraints: Pearl 1987, 1988, 2000, 2009a, 2009b; Chalak and Hal White 2009).
  3. Imputing missing data (Eff and Dow 2009, and derived from National survey research methods: Rubin 1987).
  4. Analyzing spatiotemporal processes and patterns that allow open access interactive geodatabase GIS visualizations.

Map of language families of 186 societies in the SCCS

Map of Language families of 186 societies in the SCCS (Standard Cross-Cultural Sample)

Click image to the right to open the map. May be copied under the Creative Commons license. TO MAKE YOUR OWN MAP from the UCI computer lab click Making maps in Spss for directions or go to our GIS server.


Svg to svg url networks

HSC Videoconference Friday January 29 2010 Michael Goodchild

1:30-3:15 Michael F. Goodchild, Chair, Geography, Director, Center for Spatial Studies / Center for Spatially Integrated Social Science, University of California, Geography, UCSB. home. Prof. Goodchild is a recipient of the Robert T. Aangeenbrug GISSG Distinguished Career Award (Association of American Geographers Geographic Information Systems and Science Specialty Group).

Research on Volunteered Geographic Information - user-generated GIS geospatial content - pdf - ppt - video

In recent years a significant new source of geographic information has become available as a result of the activities of large numbers of neogeographers -- individuals who are largely without training in geography, cartography, or GIS. I review a selection of examples and discuss defining dimensions that emerge from an inventory of prominent sites. VGI is a subset of user-generated Web content, and raises similar research questions: who contributes and why, what do they contribute about, what is the quality of the result, and what can be done with this new information source? I discuss the results of research on the geographically tagged content of Wikipedia, as well as other projects that are shedding light on these questions. VGI has a special role to play in providing timely updates, especially in time-critical situations such as emergencies, and I review the experience of the past two years of wildfires in Santa Barbara. VGI is potentially useful in science, as a form of citizen science and a source of soft data. I conclude with some findings regarding data quality, and the special conditions that attach to geographic information.

Examples:

  1. 3030 Anteater I&R Bldg (AIRB) UCI: Soc Sci 240B (72100) Social Networks and Human Social Complexity (D. White)
  2. 285 Powell Library UCLA f-w-s Anthro M193/Hum CS M193P (ugrad) and Anthro 294 (grad). (D. Read) Human Social Complexity
  3. 260 Galbraith Hall UCSD f-w-s Anth 203 (G. Algaze) "Four Campus Video Conference" in Human Social Complexity
  4. 250 Olson Hall UC DAVIS UC Davis classroom technology Services Bill Sykes Academic Technology (530) 752-2133 ats@ucdavis.edu

UCSB Videoconference lab. "Karen Doehner" <kdoehner@spatial.ucsb.edu> 805-893-8224. IT person, Guylene Gadal, same number.

HSC Videoconference Friday February 12 2010 Ningchuan Xiao

1:30-3:15 Ningchuan Xiao Associate Professor, Geography, Ohio State University. Xiao will give a talk about the usage of the genetic algorithm for space optimization policy and for the GIS aspects. He will broadcast the teleconference from OSU. http://bit.ly/biF0xR - video

Metaheuristic approaches to spatial decision making - pdf for talk

Spatial components are critical in many decision making problems such as land use planning, environmental conservation, facility location, and political redistricting. Finding solutions to these problems, however, is often computationally challenging if exact methods such as mathematical programming are used. To address the computational issue, metaheuristic approaches (e.g., genetic algorithms and simulated annealing) have been widely used to search for high quality solutions efficiently. In this talk, I will provide an overview of problems in spatial decision making and discuss the development of a general framework that can be used to address various spatial decision problems, with a focus placed on the use of genetic algorithms. I will also discuss how high-performance computing and web-based technology can be used in making spatial decisions.

  1. 3030 Anteater I&R Bldg (AIRB) UCI: Soc Sci 240B (72100) Social Networks and Human Social Complexity (D. White)
  2. 285 Powell Library UCLA f-w-s Anthro M193/Hum CS M193P (ugrad) and Anthro 294 (grad). (D. Read) Human Social Complexity
  3. 260 Galbraith Hall UCSD f-w-s Anth 203 (G. Algaze) "Four Campus Video Conference" in Human Social Complexity
  4. 250 Olson Hall UC DAVIS UC Davis classroom technology Services Bill Sykes Academic Technology (530) 752-2133 ats@ucdavis.edu

HSC Videoconference Friday February 26 2009 F. Eugene Yates

1:30-3:15 F. Eugene Yates, M.D., Ralph and Marjorie Crump Professor of Medical Engineering (emeritus)/ UCLA. Yates is editor of Self-organizing Systems: The Emergence of Order. New York: Plenum. 1988. Short url for this page: http://bit.ly/bdfhR6 - pdf of - the powerpoint. Introduction to the speaker - drw - video (needs a ShockWave Flash (SWF) player) updated video synched to talk

Conjectures on Consciousness
3030 Anteater I&R Bldg (AIRB) UCI
285 Powell Library UCLA
260 Galbraith Hall UCSD
250 Olson Hall UC DAVIS UC Davis classroom technology Services Bill Sykes Academic Technology (530) 752-2133 ats@ucdavis.edu

ABSTRACT FOR TALK. Understanding consciousness challenges normal science so brutally that we have to wonder if it is within reach of our logical/mathematical and empirical methods. How do we “map” from objective, physical situations to subjective (conscious) experiences of them? To approach this question, I begin by asking another, viz., “If we had means to construct a “consciousness-detector” (even just as a thought experiment), what would we ask it to measure (observe) that would not give false positives?” Failing to provide even an approximate answer would indicate that we are unfit for the quest for consciousness. I review some of the attempts to define and identify conscious “mind-states”. They are various and descriptive, and all stumble with the issue of causality. Do mind states “emerge” from brain states? I show the weakness behind the concept of emergence and reject it as useful in the quest. Are “minds” and brains in different worlds? If you are a monist – as I suspect most scientists hope to be – you are likely to find the “two-world” view physically unsatisfactory. I reject it. To set the scene for my analysis of the problem, I present some tests for consciousness, and indicate what entities in the biosphere show any signs, and comment on their evolutionary histories. Carefully pruning the evidence, retaining only the strongest, I argue that consciousness did not appear anywhere on Earth, at any time, until Mammals (~ 200 million years ago) and, as an instance of convergent evolution, in a few birds. Curiously both classes are warm-blooded. Is that a requirement for consciousness, or an mere coincidence? I draw a sharp distinction between conscious behaviors and instinctive behaviors. In leading to my conclusion that everything that happens in mind or body arises from brain-states (not an original claim), I introduce (metaphorically) a new quantum-mechanical perspective based on both Bohr complementarity and superposition, that eliminates both the need for the concept of “emergence” and of “interactions” in discussing conscious phenomena.

Biography

Urquhart, John. 2009. Living History: F. Eugene Yates. Advances in Physiological Education. 33: 234-242.

The Paper

original background paper for the talk in pdf - discussion

ABSTRACT FOR PAPER. Jan.29, 2010. This talk, based on a new essay part of which has the form of a personal narrative. My justification for that departure from the norms of technical reporting in science depends on the fact that consciousness, being itself intensely personal and private, is not a fit substrate for scientific analyses. Admission of contributions to the knowledge base of science, whether formal theories, or empirical observational or historical data, require passing strict tests of verifiability, replicability and, ultimately, plausibility, according to community standards. Private revelations are abjured. Consciousness is further disqualified by its immateriality. Brain states are material, and can be accessed by anatomical, biophysical, computational, and scanning methods. But, between brain states and mental states lies an enormous explanatory gap. There was hope (now largely abandoned) that the concept of emergence (discussed in my essay) could bridge that gap. The emergence of a new material entity from another material entity is commonplace and can usually be scientifically rationalized. But the emergence of immaterial mental states from material brain states has been, and remains, mysterious. We have no known scientific capacity to build the desired bridge.

After some background material, my essay considers the requirements that a “consciousness detector” would have to meet to convince an observer that consciousness was present (without false positives), or not, in any living system on which it was focused. I then claim that there are many (immaterial) mental states that do not include consciousness. From a “bottom-up” perspective, I present six selected examples of features of material brain states. Five are biological, but the last comes from quantum mechanics (QM). From QM I borrow a fundamental physical concept (see the essay) that I extend to neurobiology, arguing that it offers a way to dispel the dissatisfactions and disappointment we currently experience with attempts to rationalize the phenomenon of consciousness.

The essay then reexamines the concept of emergence and proposes two different kinds of emergence, seeking a new application in neurosciences, from the reductionistic (usually preferred) bottom-up perspective.

Finally, I take a quick tour of top-down approaches in regarding brains and mental states such as: boredom, hypnosis, sleep and sleepwalking, unconscious processing, split brains and dual minds, and chemically altered minds.

I summarize by suggesting a new (scientific) perspective on the (so far) intractable brain-mind (consciousness) mystery that may relieve some of our frustrations about it.

Links

Further background to the topic by drw: Culture, science and the world

HSC Videoconference Friday March 12 2010 Joerg Reichardt

1:30-3:15 Joerg Reichardt, Institute of Theoretical Physics at the University of Wuerzburg, and Postdoc at UC Davis, Physics dept. URL for this page: http://bit.ly/axwM12 - the pdf - its big! - video (needs a ShockWave Flash (SWF) player) (Student opportunity for credit: make a slidecast).

Large Scale Structure in Complex Networks - Methods of Detection and their Theoretical Limitations

  1. 3030 Anteater I&R Bldg (AIRB) UCI
  2. 285 Powell Library UCLA
  3. 260 Galbraith Hall UCSD
  4. 250 Olson Hall UC DAVIS UC Davis classroom technology Services Bill Sykes Academic Technology (530) 752-2133 ats@ucdavis.edu

Abstract. Not all nodes are created equal in complex networks. Rather, they play diverse roles in the functioning of a network and their role is reflected in the network's link structure. Hence, structural analysis can be used to infer the latent roles and functions of nodes purely based on connectivity data. Currently, network structure is studied at three different levels. At the macro level, global network properties such as degree distributions, path-lengths, diameters or clustering coefficients are investigated. At the micro level, properties of individual nodes and edges such as centrality indices or rank functions such as page-rank are studied. The study of the meso-scale, which aims at studying joint properties of groups of nodes, so far has mainly been focussed on the detection of cohesive subgroups of nodes, so-called communities.

The talk will show that, though important, communities are only one special case of a much wider class of mesoscopic structures called "stochastic block structures". This name comes from the fact that latent classes of roles and their resultant patterns of connectivity in a network account for salient block structure in the adjacency matrix of a network when the rows and columns are ordered according to these latent roles.

We present an effective and accurate algorithm that performs this task employing a purely Bayesian approach, show that it outperforms competing approaches and present applications to real world data sets that open new frontiers of research in the study of both structure, function and evolution of complex networks from a mesoscopic perspective.

Additionally, we will investigate the limits of such purely data driven approaches to the detection of latent structure in networks using the toolbox of statistical mechanics. We will show that there exists a phase transition between detectable and in-principle undetectable structure in sparse networks and present approximation formulas to calculate the transition point and the shape of the transition.

Spring Quarter 2010

HSC Videoconference Friday April 23 2010 UCSD facility not available

HSC Videoconference Friday April 30 2010 Mark Lubell

2:15-3:05 (half hour talk and discussion) Lubell, Mark. Environmental Science and Policy. Lubell works on collective goods problems and is a former student of Elinor Ostrom.

Complexity of the governance in the SF Bay webcast
http://bit.ly/dAsLSY: short url for this talk. Paper for the talk: Policy Coordination in an Ecology of Water Management Games Mark Lubell, Garry Robins (Melbourne), and Peng Wang (Melbourne).

Abstract: Public policy researchers must face the reality that policy outcomes in all but the simplest policy arenas emerge from a complex of ecology of games featuring multiple actors, policy institutions, and issues, and not just single policies operating in isolation. This paper updates Long's (1958) ecology of games framework with Scharpf's (1997) actor‐centered institutionalism to analyze the coordinating roles of actor and institutions on the context of the ecology of water management games in the San Francisco Bay. Actors participating in multiple institutions are analyzed with exponential random graph models of bipartite networks, comparing observed network structures to those predicted by simple models. We find that the most important coordinators in the SF Bay policy ecology are Federal and State agency actors, along with collaborative policy institutions. In addition, network configurations associated with closure and clustering show the most significant departures from the expected frequencies from null random models.

  1. 3030 Anteater I&R Bldg (AIRB) UCI
  2. 285 Powell Library UCLA
  3. 260 Galbraith Hall UCSD
  4. 230 Olson Hall UC DAVIS UC Davis classroom technology Services Bill Sykes Academic Technology (530) 752-2133 ats@ucdavis.edu

HSC Videoconference Friday May 14 2010 Raissa D'Souza

1:30-3:15 Raissa D'Souza Statistical Physics, UC Davis. External Professor, Santa Fe Institute

Percolation in isolated and interacting networks (Complex Networks and Dynamics) - pdf of powerpoint - webcast

  • Abstract: Networks with complex structures and functions are pervasive in the modern world, spanning social, biological and technological systems. Random graphs provide a framework for modeling network phenomena, especially phase transitions, such as the sudden emergence of large-scale connectivity. This talk will present a variant of the classic Erdos-Renyi model of network formation (using the power of two choices), showing that we can alter the location and also the nature of the phase transition, making for an explosive onset of connectivity. Next we develop random graph models of interacting networks, motivated by the fact that individual networks are increasingly interdependent (e.g., the Internet and the power grid, globalization of financial markets and of social networks). I show that interactions between different types of networks can actually lower the critical threshold, allowing large-scale connectivity to be achieved with fewer overall connections, with implications for the spread of disease across geographic regions and the potential design of simple communications networks.
  1. 3030 Anteater I&R Bldg (AIRB) UCI
  2. 285 Powell Library UCLA
  3. 260 Galbraith Hall UCSD
  4. 250 Olson Hall UC DAVIS UC Davis classroom technology Services Bill Sykes Academic Technology (530) 752-2133 ats@ucdavis.edu cell 530-681-2042

HSC Videoconference Friday June 4 2010 cancelled due to conflicts with Marschak

1:30-3:15

  1. 3030 Anteater I&R Bldg (AIRB) UCI
  2. 285 Powell Library UCLA
  3. 260 Galbraith Hall UCSD
  4. 250 Olson Hall UC DAVIS UC Davis classroom technology Services Bill Sykes Academic Technology (530) 752-2133 ats@ucdavis.edu

2010-2011

HSC Videoconference Friday Sept 24 2010 Doug White

1:30-3:15 Date can be changed: Douglas R. White, IMBS, UCI Multiscale/Multilevel Progeny Networks: Progenerative causal and evolutionary analysis ("Bringing networks to life") A joint project with Andrej Mrvar

Abstract: Living beings have phylogenetic and genealogical networks and exist in the context of multi-level emergent entities such as ecosystems, social and kinship networks, and geographic distributions. Modeled with multi-level graphical and formal network analysis, explanatory and causal models are evaluated in ways that include the mutual causality of cohesive communities, resources, inheritance, and migration. Clickable multi-level SVG graphs, Pajek, R, ArcGIS and other analytical systems are brought into a new systems-modeling configuration for trial analysis of sustainability in evolutionary and ecological processes. tinyurl: http://tinyurl.com/cqu697

  • [C:\pajek\URLnet\url1.htm pretest url.htm]
  • The key to the software

Svg to svg url networks

  • Cohesive community cutoffs (k-cohesion level and size)
sustainability/extinction thresholds
Ecosystem
Species
Farming community
Foraging community
Kinship community
bubble creation/collapse
city growth
market growth
empire expansion
inequality expansion