User:Thomas Weaver

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Thomas Weaver articles on World system

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Thomas Weaver Publications in WST

2008 Neoliberalism and the Social Relations in Forestry Production in Chihuahua. In Thomas Weaver, James B. Greenberg, Anne Browning-Aiken, William L. Alexander, editors. Tucson: University of Arizona Press (In Press).

2008 Up the Mode in the Period of Post-Neoliberalism. In Thomas Weaver, James B. Greenberg, Anne Browning-Aiken, William L. Alexander, editors. Tucson: University of Arizona Press (In Press).

2001 Space, Time, and Articulation in the Economic Development of the US-Mexico Border Region: 1940-2000. Human Organization 60 (2):105-120.

2000 Changes in Forestry Policy, Production, and the Environment, in Northern Mexico: 1960-2000. Journal of Political Ecology 7:1-16

2000 An Introduction to World System Theory (Manuscript in author’s possession).

1999 A Summary of Modernization, Dependency, World-system, Marxism, Neo-Marxism, Articulation of Modes of Production, and the Social Production of Space on the US-Mexico Border (Manuscript in author’s possession).

1998 The Social Production of Space on the US-Mexico Border (Manuscript in author’s possession).

1996 Mapping the Policy Terrain; Political Economy, Policy Environment, and Articulation of Forestry Development in Northern Mexico. The Journal of Political Ecology 3: 37-68. Awarded the Robert McC. Netting Prize in Political Ecology for the best article advancing research in political ecology in 1996.

Selected Books:

2008 (Editor and Contributor) Neoliberalism and Commodity Production in Mexico. Thomas Weaver, James B. Greenberg, Anne Browning-Aiken, William L. Alexander, editors. Tucson: University of Arizona Press (In Press).

2003 (Editor and Contributor) The Dynamics of Applied Anthropology in the Twentieth Century: The Malinowski Award Papers. Oklahoma City: Society for Applied Anthropology (The Society’s First Online Publication).

1994 (Editor and Contributor) Anthropology, Volume 4. Handbook of Hispanic Cultures in the United States. Houston: University of Houston and Arte Public Press.

1992 Viente Siglos de Adaptacion Cultural en el Suroeste Grande (Twenty Centuries of Cultural Adaptation in the Greater Southwest). Handbook of Indigenous Cultures in the New World, Volume 20. Madrid: Mapfre Publishing Company, 383 pp.

1979 (with E. Adamson Hoebel) Anthropology and the Human Experience. New York: McGraw-Hill Book Company, 699 pp. Spanish translation published in 1985. Antropologia y Experiencia Humana. Barcelona, Ediciones Omega, S.A., 677 pp.

1976 (Editor and Contributor with T. Downing) Mexican Migration. Tucson: Bureau of Ethnic Research, University of Arizona, pp. 1-9.

1974 (Editor and Contributor) Indians of Arizona. Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 169 pp.

1973 (Editor and Contributor) To See Ourselves: Anthropology and Modern Social Issues. Glenview, Illinois: Scott, Foreman and Company, 485 pp.

1973 Report of the Committee on Minorities and Anthropology, Washington D.C.: American Anthropological Association.

1972 (Editor and Contributor, with Douglas White) The Anthropology of Urban Environments. Boulder: Society for Applied Anthropology, Monograph Number 11.

Selected Articles and Chapters:

2008 Neoliberalism and the Social Relations in Forestry Production in Chihuahua. In Neoliberalism and Commodity Production in Mexico. Thomas Weaver, James B. Greenberg, Anne Browning-Aiken, William L. Alexander, editors. Tucson: University of Arizona Press.

2008 Up the Mode in the Period of Post-Neoliberalism. In Neoliberalism and Commodity Production in Mexico. Thomas Weaver, James B. Greenberg, Anne Browning-Aiken, William L. Alexander, editors. Tucson: University of Arizona Press.

2002 Valoració de l’antropologia aplicada als Estats Units: 1985-1998. Revista d’ethnologia de Catalunya 20:12-43.

2001 Forestry Policy, the Environment, and Production in Northern Mexico: 1960-2000. Journal of Political Ecology.

1994 The Culture of Latinos in the United States; also Latino Legacies: Crossing National and Creating Cultural Borders. In T. Weaver, editor. The Handbook of Hispanics in the United States: Anthropology. Pp. 15-38, 39-58 .Houston: Arte Publico Press, University of Houston.

1994 Development in Action: Indigenous Forestry, the Land Tenure Law and the World Bank. High Plains Applied Anthropologist 14 (1):1-22.

1988 The Human Rights of Undocumented Workers in the United States-Mexico Border Region. In Human Rights and Anthropology. T. E. Downing and G. Kushner, editors. Pp. 73-90. Cambridge: Cultural Survival, Inc.

1985 Anthropology as a Policy Science: Part I, A Critique. Human Organization 44(2): 97-105.

1985 Anthropology as a Policy Science: Part II, Development and Training. Human Organization 44(3): 197-205.

1983 The Social Effects of the Ecology and Development of the U.S.-Mexico Border. In Stanley Ross, editor. Ecology and Development of the Border Region: Proceedings of the Second Binational University Symposium-Border Studies. Pp. 233-270. Mexico: ANUIES.

1982 From Primitive to Urban Anthropology. In E. Adamson Hoebel, R. Currier and S. Kaiser, editors. Crisis in Anthropology: View from Spring Hill, 1980. Pp. 203-220. New York: Garland Publishing, Inc.

1970 Use of Hypothetical Situations in a Study of Spanish American Illness Referral Systems. Human Organization, 29 (2): 140-154.

Short Bio

Thomas Weaver was born in Greenville, NM and is professor emeritus of anthropology at the University of Arizona, Tucson where he taught from 1969 to 2002. Previously he had joint appointments in the Departments of Psychiatry and Anthropology at the University of Pittsburgh and in the Departments of Behavioral Science in Medicine and Anthropology at the University of Kentucky. He graduated with a Ph.D. in anthropology (with minors in sociology and geography) at the University of California, Berkeley in January 1965 and received a BA and MA from the University of New Mexico in anthropology, history, and psychology. While completing his graduate work at Berkeley he served as Executive Secretary of the California Commission on Indian Affairs, directing research, appointing an advisory committee with Indian membership, and issuing a policy document that did much to improve the stock of California Indians. Policy anthropology came to characterize his career. He has been involved in interdisciplinary research from the beginning, first with a health project in the mountains of NM, then in the medical schools, and in the Bureau. He came to Arizona as Director of the Bureau of Ethnic Studies (now called the Bureau of Applied Research in Anthropology, BARA), where he directed interdisciplinary research on American Indian reservations and in Mexico on economic development, political organization, border studies, migration, and other subjects. He has taught courses in economic development, change, applied, world-systems, policy, Mexico, borders, and other topics. He has served in professional offices and committees in a number of professional societies including president of the Society for Applied Anthropology, the Southwestern Anthropological Association, and the Association of Latina and Latino Anthropologists, the latter of which he was founding charter member. Over his career he has served actively on the usual commissions and committees characteristic of a faculty member and active professional. He worked with American Indians in NM, AZ, California, Nevada, and with the Tarahumara of Chihuahua, Mexico since 1978. More recently he was instrumental in creating an International Consortium for the Anthropological, Genetic, and Epidemiological Study of Tuberculosis with projects among the Tarahumara and with the Mixtec in Arizona. Other activity includes books with Douglas White on World Systems Theory, another on Globalization, and projects on Urbanization and Neoliberalism in the Coachella Valley of California, and on Tuberculosis among the Mixtec of Sonora, Arizona, and California. He has presented over 170 papers in the US, Mexico, Canada, Chile, Argentina, Italy, and Spain. His awards include Distinguished Lecturer at UC Long Beach, Colorado, the Southwestern Anthropological Association, The High Plains Society for Applied Anthropology, the Robert Netting Award for contributions to advancement of theory in political ecology from the Society for Political Ecology, and a nomination for the Malinowski Award from the Society for Applied Anthropology.